Astrophoto: The Macro Moon

Article written: 13 May , 2013
Updated: 23 Dec , 2015
by

This very creative self-portrait by astrophotographer Miguel Claro shows what appears to be the photographer taking a ‘macro’ closeup of the crescent Moon! But there is a lot more going on in this image. The crescent Moon has just 3% of the disc illuminated by the Sun, but there is a stunningly bright Earthshine effect visible. This image was taken on May 11, 2013, so there is a conjunction between the Moon and Jupiter (the brightest star in the image). Venus was also in conjunction, but at the time this image was taken, it was covered by the cloudy band low on the horizon.

Another shot below:

A silhouette of photographer Miguel Claro along with the crescent Moon and Jupiter. Credit and copyright: Miguel Claro.

A silhouette of photographer Miguel Claro along with the crescent Moon and Jupiter. Credit and copyright: Miguel Claro.

Images taken from Capuchos, Almada, Portugal with a Canon 50D – ISO400; Exp. 2sec. F/4; 35mm, on May 11, 2013 at 21:41 and 21:43. Enjoy more of Claro’s images at his website.

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1 Response

  1. Sorry, but neither Jupiter nor Venus were in conjunction (with the moon, or with one another). That’s only when two bodies share either the same right ascension or the same ecliptic longitude. Jupiter and the moon weren’t in conjunction until around 16 hours after this photo was taken. Also, Venus was not in the clouds–it was below the local horizon at the time of the photo.

    However:

    – On May 24th, Mercury and Venus will be in conjunction, 1.3° apart (with Jupiter 4° away)

    – On May 26th, Mercury and Jupiter will be in conjunction, 2.5° apart (with Venus only 2° away), and

    – On May 28th, Venus and Jupiter will be in conjunction, 1° apart (with Mercury only 2.6° away)

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