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Order Of the Planets From The Sun

Planets and other objects in our Solar System. Credit: NASA.

Planets and other objects in our Solar System. Credit: NASA.

First the quick facts: Our Solar System has eight “official” planets which orbit the Sun. Here are the planets listed in order of their distance from the Sun:

Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

An easy mnemonic for remembering the order is “My Very Educated Mother Just Served Us Noodles.”

Now, let’s look at a few details including the definition of a planet, as well as details about each of the planets in our Solar System.

What is a planet?

In 2006, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) decided on the definition of a planet. The definition states that in our Solar System, a planet is a celestial body which:

  • is in orbit around the Sun,
  • has sufficient mass to assume hydrostatic equilibrium (a nearly round shape),
  • has “cleared the neighborhood” around its orbit.
  • is not a moon.

    This means that Pluto, which was considered to be the farthest planet since its discovery in 1930, now is classified as a dwarf planet. The change in the definition came after the discovery three bodies that were all similar to Pluto in terms of size and orbit, (Quaoar in 2002, Sedna in 2003, and Eris in 2005). With advances in equipment and techniques, astronomers knew that more objects like Pluto would very likely be discovered, and so the number of planets in our Solar System would start growing quickly. It soon became clear that either they all had to be called planets or Pluto and bodies like it would have to be reclassified.

    With much controversy then and since, Pluto was reclassified as a dwarf planet in 2006. This also reclassified the asteroid Ceres as a dwarf planet, too, and so the first five recognized dwarf planets are Ceres, Pluto, Eris, Makemake and Haumea. Scientists believe there may be dozens more dwarf planets awaiting discovery.

    Later, in 2008, the IAU announced the subcategory of dwarf planets with trans-Neptunian orbits would be known as “plutoids.” Said the IAU, “Plutoids are celestial bodies in orbit around the Sun at a distance greater than that of Neptune that have sufficient mass for their self-gravity to overcome rigid body forces so that they assume a hydrostatic equilibrium (near-spherical) shape, and that have not cleared the neighborhood around their orbit.”

    This subcategory includes Pluto, Haumea, Makemake and Eris.

    The Planets in our Solar System:

    Here is a brief look at the eight planets in our Solar System. Included are quick facts and links so you can find out more about each planet.

    Mercury, as imaged by the MESSENGER spacecraft, revealing parts of the never seen by human eyes. Image Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington

    Mercury, as imaged by the MESSENGER spacecraft, revealing parts of the never seen by human eyes. Image Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington

    Mercury

  • Mercury is the closest planet to the Sun, just 58 million km (36 million miles) or 0.39 AU out, but it is not the hottest planet.
  • Mercury is the smallest planet in our Solar System, and is just slightly larger than the Earth’s moon, and equivalent in size to 0.38 Earths.
  • Diameter: 4,879 km (3,032 miles)
  • Length of Year (Orbit): 87.97 Earth days
  • Length of Day: 59 Earth days.
  • Mercury is a rocky planet, one of the four “terrestrial planets” in our Solar System. Mercury has a solid, cratered surface, and looks much like Earth’s moon.
  • If you weigh 45 kg (100 pounds) on Earth, you would weigh 17 kg (38 pounds) on Mercury.
  • Mercury does not have any moons.
  • Temperatures on Mercury range between -173 to 427 degrees Celcius (-279 to 801 degrees Fahrenheit)
  • Just two spacecraft have visited Mercury: Mariner 10 in 1974-75 and MESSENGER, which flew past Mercury three times before going into orbit around Mercury in 2011 and ended its mission by impacting the surface of Mercury on April 30, 2015. MESSENGER has changed our understanding of this planet, and scientists are still studying the data.
  • Find more details about Mercury at this article on Universe Today, and this page from NASA.
    A radar view of Venus taken by the Magellan spacecraft, with some gaps filled in by the Pioneer Venus orbiter. Credit: NASA/JPL

    A radar view of Venus taken by the Magellan spacecraft, with some gaps filled in by the Pioneer Venus orbiter. Credit: NASA/JPL

    Venus:

  • Venus is the second planet from the Sun, and it is the hottest planet in the Solar System due to its thick, toxic atmosphere which has been described as having a “runaway greenhouse effect” on the planet.
  • Distance from Sun: 108 million km (67 million miles) or 0.72 AU.
  • Venus is often called Earth’s “sister planet,” as it is just a little smaller than Earth. Venus is 81.5% as massive as Earth, and has 90% of its surface area and 86.6% of its volume.
  • Diameter: 7,521 miles (12,104 km)
  • Mass: 4.867E24 kg (0.815 Earth mass)
  • Length of Year (Orbit): 225 days
  • Length of day: 243 Earth days
  • Surface temperature: 462 degrees C (864 degrees F)
  • Venus’ thick and toxic atmosphere is made up mostly of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrogen (N2), with clouds of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) droplets.
  • Venus has no moons.
  • Venus spins backwards (retrograde rotation), compared to the other planets. This means that the sun rises in the west and sets in the east on Venus.
  • If you weigh 45 kg (100 pounds) on Earth, you would weigh 41 kg (91 pounds) on Venus.
  • Venus is also known and the “morning star” or “evening star” because it is often brighter than any other object in the sky and is usually seen either at dawn or at dusk. Since it is so bright, it has often been mistaken for a UFO!
  • More than 40 spacecraft have explored Venus. The Magellan mission in the early 1990s mapped 98 percent of the planet’s surface. Find out more about all the missions here.
  • Find out more about Venus on this article from Universe Today, and this page from NASA.
    This color image of Earth was taken by NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) on the  Deep Space Climate Observatory satellite on July 6, 2015, showing North and Central America. Credit: NASA.

    This color image of Earth was taken by NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) on the Deep Space Climate Observatory satellite on July 6, 2015, showing North and Central America. Credit: NASA.

    Earth (Home!)

  • Distance from Sun: 150 million km (93 million miles) or one AU.
  • Diameter: 12,760 km (7,926 miles)
  • Length of Year (Orbit): 365 days
  • Length of day: 24 hours (more precisely, 23 hours, 56 minutes and 4 seconds.)
  • Surface temperature: Average is about 14 C, (57 F), with ranges from -88 to 58 (min/max) C (-126 to 136 F).
  • Earth is another terrestrial planet with an ever-changing surface, and 70 percent of the Earth’s surface is covered in oceans.
  • Earth has one moon.
  • Earth’s atmosphere is 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, and 1% various other gases.
  • Earth is the only world known to harbor life.
  • Find out more about Earth at a series of articles found here on Universe Today, and on this webpage from NASA.
    Global mosaic of Mars showing the dark basaltic Syrtis Major Planus region made from Viking Orbiter images. (NSSDC)

    Global mosaic of Mars showing the dark basaltic Syrtis Major Planus region made from Viking Orbiter images. (NSSDC)

    Mars

  • Distance from Sun: Mars is the fourth planet from the sun at a distance of about 228 million km (142 million miles) or 1.52 AU.
  • Diameter: 6,787 km, (4,217 miles)
  • Length of Year (Orbit): 687 Earth days.
  • Length of day: 24 hours 37 minutes.
  • Surface temperature: Average is about -55 C (-67 F), with ranges of -153 to +20 °C (-225 to +70 °F)
  • Mars is the fourth terrestrial planet in our Solar System. Its rocky surface has been altered by volcanoes, impacts, and atmospheric effects such as dust storms.
  • Mars has a thin atmosphere made up mostly of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen (N2) and argon (Ar).

    If you weigh 45 kg (100 pounds) on Earth, you would weigh 17 kg (38 pounds) on Mars.

  • Mars has two small moons, Phobos and Deimos.
  • Mars is known as the Red Planet because iron minerals in the Martian soil oxidize, or rust, causing the soil to look red.
  • More than 40 spacecraft have been launched to Mars. You can find out more about missions to Mars here.

    Find out more about Mars at this series of articles on Universe Today, and at this NASA webpage.

    Graphical comparison showing how Jupiter's Great Red Spot has shrunk in the past 125 years. Credit: Damian Peach

    Graphical comparison showing how Jupiter’s Great Red Spot has shrunk in the past 125 years. Credit: Damian Peach

    Jupiter

  • Distance from Sun: Jupiter is the fifth planet from the sun at a distance of about 778 million km (484 million miles) or 5.2 AU.
  • Diameter: 428,400 km (88,730 miles)
  • Jupiter is the most massive planet in our solar system, 317 times the mass of Earth.
  • Length of Year (Orbit): 11.9 Earth years
  • Length of day: 9.8 Earth hours
  • Temperature: -148 C, (-234 F)
  • Jupiter is a gas giant planet, made mostly hydrogen and helium, with swirling clouds of other trace gases.
  • Jupiter has 50 known moons, with an additional 17 moons awaiting confirmation of their discovery – for a total of 67 moons. Jupiter is almost like a mini solar system!
  • Jupiter has a faint ring system, discovered in 1979 by the Voyager 1 mission.
  • If you weigh 45 kg (100 pounds) on Earth, you would weigh 115 kg (253) pounds on Jupiter.
  • Jupiter’s Great Red Spot is a gigantic storm (bigger than Earth) that has been raging for hundreds of years. However, it appears to be shrinking in recent years.
  • Many missions have visited Jupiter and its system of moons, with the latest being the Juno mission will arrive at Jupiter in 2016. You can find out more about missions to Jupiter here.
  • Find out more about Jupiter at this series of articles on Universe Today and on this webpage from NASA.
    Saturn's relatively thin main rings are about 250,000 km (156,000 miles) in diameter. (Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI/J. Major)

    Saturn’s relatively thin main rings are about 250,000 km (156,000 miles) in diameter. (Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI/J. Major)

    Saturn

  • Distance from Sun: Saturn is the sixth planet from the Sun at a distance of about 1.4 billion km (886 million miles) or 9.5 AU.
  • Diameter: 120,500 km (74,900 miles)
  • Length of Year (Orbit): 29.5 Earth years
  • Length of day: 10.7 Earth hours
  • Temperature: -178 C (-288 F)
  • Saturn is a gas-giant planet and does not have a solid surface.
  • Saturn’s atmosphere is made up mostly of hydrogen (H2) and helium (He).
  • Saturn has a spectacular ring system made of seven rings with several gaps and divisions between them.
  • If you weigh 45 kg (100 pounds) on Earth, you would weigh about 48 kg (107 pounds) on Saturn
  • Saturn has 53 known moons with an additional 9 moons awaiting confirmation.
  • Five missions have gone to Saturn. Since 2004, Cassini has been exploring Saturn, its moons and rings. You can out more about missions to Saturn here.
  • Find out more about Saturn at this series of articles on Universe Today and at this webpage from NASA.
    Uranus as seen through the automated eyes of Voyager 2 in 1986. (Credit: NASA/JPL).

    Uranus as seen through the automated eyes of Voyager 2 in 1986. (Credit: NASA/JPL).

    Uranus

  • Distance from Sun: Uranus is the seventh planet from the sun at a distance of about 2.9 billion km (1.8 billion miles) or 19.19 AU.
  • Diameter: 51,120 km (31,763 miles)
  • Length of Year (Orbit): 84 Earth years
  • Length of day: 18 Earth hours
  • Temperature: -216 C (-357 F)
  • Uranus is an ice giant. Most of the planet’s mass is made up of a hot dense fluid of “icy” materials – water (H2O), methane (CH4). and ammonia (NH3) – above a small rocky core.
  • Uranus has an atmosphere which is mostly made up of hydrogen (H2) and helium (He), with a small amount of methane (CH4). The methane gives Uranus a blue-green tint.
  • If you weigh 45 kg (100 pounds) on Earth, you would weigh 41 kg (91 pounds) on Uranus.
  • Uranus has 27 moons.
  • Uranus has faint rings; the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.
  • Voyager 2 is the only spacecraft to have visited Uranus. Find out more about this mission here.
  • You can find out more about Uranus at this series of articles on Universe Today and this webpage from NASA.
    Neptune photographed by Voyage. Image credit: NASA/JPL

    Neptune photographed by Voyager 2. Image credit: NASA/JPL

    Neptune

  • Distance from Sun: Neptune is the eighth planet from the sun at a distance of about 4.5 billion km (2.8 billion miles) or 30.07 AU.
  • Diameter: 49,530 km (30,775 miles)
  • Length of Year (Orbit): 165 Earth years
  • Length of day: 16 Earth hours
  • Temperature: -214 C (-353 F)
  • Neptune is mostly made of a very thick, very hot combination of water (H2O), ammonia (NH3), and methane (CH4) over a possible heavier, approximately Earth-sized, solid core.
  • Neptune’s atmosphere is made up mostly of hydrogen (H2), helium (He) and methane (CH4).
  • Neptune has 13 confirmed moons and 1 more awaiting official confirmation.
  • Neptune has six rings.
  • If you weigh 45 kg (100 pounds) on Earth, you would weigh 52 kg (114 pounds) on Neptune.
    Neptune was the first planet to be predicted to exist by using math.

  • Voyager 2 is the only spacecraft to have visited Neptune. You can find out more about this mission here.
  • Find out more about Neptune at this series of articles on Universe Today and this NASA webpage.

    We have written many articles about the planets for Universe Today. Here are some facts about planets, and here’s an article about the names of the planets.

    If you’d like more info on the Solar System planets, dwarf planets, asteroids and more, check out NASA’s Solar System exploration page, and here’s a link to NASA’s Solar System Simulator.

    We’ve also recorded a series of episodes of Astronomy Cast about every planet in the Solar System. Start here, Episode 49: Mercury.

    About 

    Nancy Atkinson is currently Universe Today's Contributing Editor. Previously she served as UT's Senior Editor and lead writer, and has worked with Astronomy Cast and 365 Days of Astronomy. Nancy is also a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador.

  • Comments on this entry are closed.

    • Steven August 20, 2015, 11:50 AM

      Considering all the other planets have plain optical pictures I think Venus should have one – perhaps in strips with visual, ultraviolet (since there is something to see there), and radar or something….

    • TedH August 20, 2015, 4:03 PM

      Hi folks, no matter what some people say: for me Pluto will always be in the list of “our planets”…. so one icy rock is missing 😉

    • Gerald August 20, 2015, 4:55 PM

      I’d like to propose that we stop teaching that the Solar System consists of eight “official” planets. Instead, let us start teaching that the Solar System consists of three categories of planets: Terrestrial Planets, Gas Giant Planets, and Dwarf Planets.
      I was recently approached by an elementary school teacher who was frustrated because she still has students asking “What happened to Pluto.” To make matters worse, because of limited resources, she was obligated to literally tear off the Pluto section of the Solar System handout she used in class. This only reinforced her students perception that (evil) astronomers have taken away Pluto.
      After spending time discussing this with the teacher, I proposed to her that she teach that the Solar System has different categories or types of planets, with Dwarf Planets (including Pluto) just one category. She loved it! It gave her a whole new way of introducing the Solar System to her students as something much more than eight “official” planets.
      We spent a few minutes at the computer and produced a Dwarf Planet handout that she will now use when teaching about the Solar System. Pluto has not been taken away; it just has some new friends!

      • laurele August 23, 2015, 2:48 PM

        Great job! Who forced this teacher to tear Pluto out of the planets section of the solar system? We need to reach out to them, whoever they are, and teach them what you taught this teacher.

    • Pete August 21, 2015, 10:38 AM

      Well done, Gerald!
      And an excellent solution to the “Number of actual planets” conundrum.
      The solar system should be explained and described as the system it is.

    • laurele August 23, 2015, 2:44 PM

      First, a correction: Our solar system does NOT have only eight “official” planets. It has at minimum 14 and counting: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Ceres, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto, Charon, Hauema, Makemake, and Eris.

      Dwarf planets are planets too; they are a subclass of planets. That was the intention of the person who first coined the term, none other than Alan Stern. The four percent of the IAU who voted on the controversial 2006 definition misused the term Stern created.

      Unfortunately, you are giving unjustified privilege to the IAU definition, which is just one among several in an ongoing debate. That definition was adopted by 424 out of 10,000 IAU members, most of whom are not planetary scientists but other types of astronomers. This means they are NOT experts in the field of planetary science. The resolution they adopted was done in violation of the IAU’s own bylaws, which prohibits putting a resolution to the floor of the General Assembly without first having it vet by the appropriate IAU committee.

      The highly flawed IAU definition was immediately rejected by several hundred professional astronomers, a number roughly equal to those who adopted the definition. These scientists prefer the geophysical planet definition, according to which a planet is any non-self-luminous spheroidal body orbiting a star, free floating in space, or even orbiting another planet. If an object is not a star and is large enough and massive enough to be rounded by its own gravity, it is a planet. This definition notably classifies objects first and foremost by their intrinsic properties rather than by their location.

      There is nothing wrong with the number of solar system planets growing quickly if that is the reality of what is out there. Keeping the number of planets artificially small so people can memorize a list of names or have a cool mnemonic has absolutely NO scientific basis. It is akin to saying Jupiter can have only four moons because no one can memorize the names of 67.

      Memorization is not important for learning. We don’t ask kids to memorize the names of all the rivers and mountains on Earth, just to know what a river and a mountain are.

      It is interesting that just as New Horizons is revealing the extent of Pluto’s planetary complexity, defenders of the IAU definition are out in force on the Internet repeating yet again the same justifications they used when first adopting their flawed definition. Simply repeating something over and over and appealing to authority (the IAU) does not make that thing true.

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