Seeking Apollo Pictures? Here’s How To Find Obscure Shots From The Moon-Landing Program

Article written: 23 Sep , 2014
Updated: 23 Dec , 2015
by

While any image from the Apollo program is stunning, some of the more iconic ones are used over and over again while equally amazing pictures remain relatively unknown.

A recent Reddit thread posted what the user said was some of the “more uncommon” images of the program. You can see the full slideshow here.

In the same spirit, we’ve posted some Apollo images below from the Lunar and Planetary Institute, which maintains a catalog of NASA shots (including some in high-resolution) on its website. We also recommend the 1999 Michael Light book Full Moon, which has dozens of lesser-known Apollo shots of high quality.

A half-Earth shines in this image taken by the Apollo 13 crew in April 1970. Credit: NASA / Lunar and Planetary Institute

A half-Earth shines in this image taken by the Apollo 13 crew in April 1970. Credit: NASA / Lunar and Planetary Institute

Footprints, dusty spacesuit knees and tools -- all a part of the Apollo 12 mission in November 1969. Credit: NASA / Lunar and Planetary Institute

Footprints, dusty spacesuit knees and tools — all a part of the Apollo 12 mission in November 1969. Credit: NASA / Lunar and Planetary Institute

Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin inside the lunar module at the Moon's Sea of Tranquility in July 1969. Credit: NASA / Lunar and Planetary Institute

Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin inside the lunar module at the Moon’s Sea of Tranquility in July 1969. Credit: NASA / Lunar and Planetary Institute

Shadowy lunar craters poke out in this image taken by the Apollo 8 crew in December 1968. Credit: NASA / Lunar and Planetary Institute

Shadowy lunar craters poke out in this image taken by the Apollo 8 crew in December 1968. Credit: NASA / Lunar and Planetary Institute

An Apollo 16 astronaut works near the lunar rover in the Descartes Highlands in April 1972. Credit: NASA / Lunar and Planetary Institute

An Apollo 16 astronaut works near the lunar rover in the Descartes Highlands in April 1972. Credit: NASA / Lunar and Planetary Institute


2 Responses

  1. Gnark1ll says

    The entire collection of surafce images, tiemlines, radio transcripts, videos, interviews..

    Just about everything you would need , whether its out of interest, study, or convincing ‘Hoax Theorists’ that they are plain wrong,is to be found at the following link

    http://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/

    The site has long been one of my favorites on the entire web.

  2. Gnark1ll says

    Perhaps this link http://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/frame.html

    Will be best to share, because its not immediately apparent what you must click to get from the ‘Homepage’ (linked above in my first comment)to the actual Journals : D

    (pro Tip..click the ‘Surface Journal Patch’

    nto sur ewhy they camoflaged it liek that!

Comments are closed.