Categories: AsteroidsCometsEarth

This Model Of Earth’s Giant Impacts Makes Us Wonder How Life Arose

In case you need a reminder that the solar system was a harsh place to grow up, the early Earth looks like it was in the middle of a shooting gallery in this model. The map that you see above shows a scenario for where researchers believe asteroids struck our planet about four billion to 4.5 billion years ago, which is very early in the Earth’s five-billion-year history.

The research reveals the surface of the Earth repeatedly being churned by these impacts as the young solar system came together, with small rocks gradually coalescing into planetesimals. Much of the leftover debris peppered the planets, including our own.

“Prior to approximately four billion years ago, no large region of Earth’s surface could have survived untouched by impacts and their effects,” stated Simone Marchi, who led the research and works at the Southwest Research Institute in Colorado.

“The new picture of the Hadean Earth emerging from this work has important implications for its habitability,” added Marchi, who is also senior researcher at NASA’s Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute.

In this dangerous early period, the researchers estimate the Earth was smacked by 1-4 asteroids or comets that were more than 600 miles (966 kilometers) wide — enough to wipe out life across the planet. They also believe that between 3-7 impactors were more than 300 miles (482 kilometers) wide, which would evaporate oceans across the world.

Artist’s conception of early Earth after several large asteroid impacts, moving magma on to the surface. Credit: Simone Marchi/SwRI

“During that time, the lag between major collisions was long enough to allow intervals of more clement conditions, at least on a local scale,” added Marchi. “Any life emerging during the Hadean eon likely needed to be resistant to high temperatures, and could have survived such a violent period in Earth’s history by thriving in niches deep underground or in the ocean’s crust.”

To produce the model, the researchers took a recent model of lunar impacts and applied it to Earth. The moon’s scarred surface helps them estimate what happened on our own planet, they said, because the craters provide an “absolute impactor flux” separate from any models that talk about how the Earth came together. Recall that erosion on the moon is very slow, providing accessible records of things that happened millions or billions of years ago.

The research was published in the journal Nature.

Source: NASA

Elizabeth Howell

Elizabeth Howell is the senior writer at Universe Today. She also works for Space.com, Space Exploration Network, the NASA Lunar Science Institute, NASA Astrobiology Magazine and LiveScience, among others. Career highlights include watching three shuttle launches, and going on a two-week simulated Mars expedition in rural Utah. You can follow her on Twitter @howellspace or contact her at her website.

Recent Posts

Pluto Has an Ocean of Liquid Water Surrounded by a 40-80 km Ice Shell

On July 14th, 2015, the New Horizons spacecraft conducted the first-ever flyby of Pluto, which…

4 hours ago

Where are All the Primordial Black Holes?

The earliest black holes in the Universe called primordial black holes (PBHs), are strong contenders…

4 hours ago

A New Telescope Can Observe Even in Broad Daylight

Astronomy is a profession that, so far, has only been done at night, at least…

7 hours ago

Next-Generation Radar Will Map Threatening Asteroids

When the Arecibo Observatory dish in Puerto Rico collapsed in 2020, astronomers lost a powerful…

10 hours ago

Hot Gas is Being Vented Away from the Center of the Milky Way

Studying gas in the Universe is no easy task. We often look to ‘non-visible’ wavelengths…

13 hours ago

How Much Water Would a Self-Sustaining Moonbase Need?

As humanity returns to the Moon in the next few years, they’re going to need…

19 hours ago