infrared

360 Degrees of Milky Way at Your Fingertips

by Bob King March 21, 2014

Touring the Milky Way’s a blast with this brand new 360-degree interactive panorama. More than 2 million infrared photos taken by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope were jigsawed into a 20-gigapixel click-and-zoom mosaic that takes the viewer from tangled nebulae to stellar jets to blast bubbles around supergiant stars.  

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SOFIA Gives Scientists a First-Class View of a Supernova

by Jason Major March 3, 2014

Astronomers wanting a closer look at the recent Type Ia supernova that erupted in M82 back in January are in luck. Thanks to NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) near-infrared observations have been made from 43,000 feet — 29,000 feet higher than some of the world’s loftiest ground-based telescopes. (And, technically, that is closer to […]

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NEOWISE Spots a “Weirdo” Comet

by Jason Major February 28, 2014

NASA’s NEOWISE mission — formerly known as just WISE — has identified the first comet of its new near-Earth object hunting career… and, according to mission scientists, it’s a “weirdo.” Jason Major on Google+

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New Technique Finds Water in Exoplanet Atmospheres

by Jason Major February 25, 2014

As more and more exoplanets are identified and confirmed by various observational methods, the still-elusive “holy grail” is the discovery of a truly Earthlike world… one of the hallmarks of which is the presence of liquid water. And while it’s true that water has been identified in the thick atmospheres of “hot Jupiter” exoplanets before, […]

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Runaway Star Shocks the Galaxy!

by Jason Major February 21, 2014

That might seem like a sensational headline worthy of a supermarket tabloid but, taken in context, it’s exactly what’s happening here! The bright blue star at the center of this image is a B-type supergiant named Kappa Cassiopeiae, 4,000 light-years away. As stars in our galaxy go it’s pretty big — over 57 million kilometers wide, […]

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