Chandra X-ray Observatory

Chandra Image May Rival July 4th Fireworks

by Shannon Hall July 4, 2014

Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter While Fourth of July festivities tonight may bring brilliant colors blazing across the night sky, only 23 million light-years away is another immense cosmic display, complete with a supermassive black hole, shock waves, and vast reservoirs of gas. The night sky […]

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Intriguing X-Ray Signal Might be Dark Matter Candidate

by Nancy Atkinson June 24, 2014

Could a strange X-ray signal coming from the Perseus galaxy cluster be a hint of the elusive dark matter in our Universe? Using archival data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton mission, astronomers found an unidentified X-ray emission line, or a spike of intensity at a very specific wavelength of X-ray light. This […]

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What Does a Supernova Sounds Like?

by Fraser Cain June 23, 2014

We’ve all been ruined by science fiction, with their sound effects in space. But if you could watch a supernova detonate from a safe distance away, what would you hear? Grab your pedantry tinfoil helmet and say the following in your best “Comic Book Guy” voice: “Don’t be ridiculous. Space does not have sound effects. […]

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Amazing New X-Ray Image of the Whirlpool Galaxy Shows it is Dotted with Black Holes

by Shannon Hall June 3, 2014

In any galaxy there are hundreds of X-ray binaries: systems consisting of a black hole capturing and heating material from a relatively low-mass orbiting companion star. But high-mass X-ray binaries — systems consisting of a black hole and an extremely high-mass companion star — are hard to come by. In the Milky Way there’s only […]

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Supernova Sweeps Away Rubbish In New Composite Image

by Elizabeth Howell April 11, 2014

Shining 24,000 light-years from Earth is an expanding leftover of a supernova that is doing a great cleanup job in its neighborhood. As this new composite image from NASA reveals, G352.7-0.1 (G352 for short) is more efficient than expected, picking up debris equivalent to about 45 times the mass of the Sun. Remove this ad Elizabeth […]

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