Chandra X-ray Observatory

Chandra Image May Rival July 4th Fireworks

by Shannon Hall July 4, 2014

While Fourth of July festivities tonight may bring brilliant colors blazing across the night sky, only 23 million light-years away is another immense cosmic display, complete with a supermassive black hole, shock waves, and vast reservoirs of gas. The night sky never ceases to amaze. And NGC 4258, also known as Messier 106, is a […]

2 comments Read the full article →

Intriguing X-Ray Signal Might be Dark Matter Candidate

by Nancy Atkinson June 24, 2014

Could a strange X-ray signal coming from the Perseus galaxy cluster be a hint of the elusive dark matter in our Universe? Using archival data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton mission, astronomers found an unidentified X-ray emission line, or a spike of intensity at a very specific wavelength of X-ray light. This […]

Read the full article →

What Does a Supernova Sounds Like?

by Fraser Cain June 23, 2014

We’ve all been ruined by science fiction, with their sound effects in space. But if you could watch a supernova detonate from a safe distance away, what would you hear? Grab your pedantry tinfoil helmet and say the following in your best “Comic Book Guy” voice: “Don’t be ridiculous. Space does not have sound effects. […]

2 comments Read the full article →

Amazing New X-Ray Image of the Whirlpool Galaxy Shows it is Dotted with Black Holes

by Shannon Hall June 3, 2014

In any galaxy there are hundreds of X-ray binaries: systems consisting of a black hole capturing and heating material from a relatively low-mass orbiting companion star. But high-mass X-ray binaries — systems consisting of a black hole and an extremely high-mass companion star — are hard to come by. In the Milky Way there’s only […]

6 comments Read the full article →

Supernova Sweeps Away Rubbish In New Composite Image

by Elizabeth Howell April 11, 2014

Shining 24,000 light-years from Earth is an expanding leftover of a supernova that is doing a great cleanup job in its neighborhood. As this new composite image from NASA reveals, G352.7-0.1 (G352 for short) is more efficient than expected, picking up debris equivalent to about 45 times the mass of the Sun. Elizabeth Howell on Google+

Read the full article →