Huge Eruption on the Sun Revisited in Spectacular HD

Article written: 5 Sep , 2012
Updated: 23 Dec , 2015
by

This one may truly knock your socks off. Remember the spectacular filament eruption on the Sun on August 31 that we posted last week? The folks from NASA Goddard’s Scientific Visualization Studio now have put out a video of the eruption in high definition, and it is definitely worth watching to witness the awesome power of the Sun. The new video also includes data from STEREO and SOHO — as well as the data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory — so the tremendous Coronal Mass Ejection is visible as it travels outward from the Sun. Wow.

Below is an image of the filament eruption that includes a scale model of Earth. As the @NASAGoddard Twitter feed posted: “Reason #1 why it’s a REALLY good thing that the sun is 93,000,000 miles 150 million km) from Earth…. [mind blowing photo]”

The image above includes an image of Earth to show the size of the filament eruption compared to the size of Earth. Credit: NASA/GSFC/SDO

Thanks to Scott Wiessinger and the Scientific Visualization Studio for the great video and images.

Nancy Atkinson is currently Universe Today’s Contributing Editor. Previously she served as UT’s Senior Editor and lead writer, and has worked with Astronomy Cast and 365 Days of Astronomy. Nancy is the author of the new book “Incredible Stories from Space: A Behind-the-Scenes Look at the Missions Changing Our View of the Cosmos.” She is also a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador.



6 Responses

  1. Member
    Aqua4U says

    Uuumph! BANG! And wowie! My, that’s a big un…. Solar max continues and with our new tools AMAZES! Mr. Sol is acting OUT! Yassir….

  2. Andres says

    I wonder how Mercury will handle that on a direct hit.

  3. chieko chieko says

    Scott Wiessinger’s name is spelled incorrectly!

  4. Andrew Wragg says

    I wonder how Earth would handle a direct hit?

    • Al_Hall says

      Was thinking the same thing. .. Has anyone seen the movie “Knowing”? It was my first thought. Curious to know how that would compare. Our would it have dissipated enough after so many millions of miles?

Comments are closed.