Every Part of Blue Origin’s New Glenn Rocket is Gigantic, Including its Nose Cone

Massive. Enormous. Huge. Gigantic. And whatever other words you find in the thesaurus all do the job when it comes to describing Blue Origin’s New Glenn Rocket. Especially its nosecone.

Blue Origin recently gave us a look at the nosecone, more properly called the payload fairing, in a short video. The company says it can fit nearly 50% more payload than the next competitor. They’re trying to build one rocket and payload fairing combination that can meet the needs of all customers: commercial, civil, and national security.

The fairing itself is 7 meters (22 ft) in diameter.

“It’s really designed for the whole spectrum, from commercial, to civil, to national security…”

Scott Henderson, Orbital Launch Director, Blue Origin.

The company points out that their New Shepard rocket can fit inside the New Glenn’s payload fairing. Truly astonishing.

Rocket engines get most of the glory, but without that payload fairing, rockets can’t do much. The payload fairing shelters the payload during the turmoil of launch, and needs to withstand all of the vibrations and other stresses. Once in orbit, the fairing falls away in two pieces, and the payload can be delivered.

Obviously, it doesn’t matter how powerful a rocket is if it can’t fit the bulk of the payload. The video was taken at the company’s Florida manufacturing facility, and shows how small people are in comparison. The fairing is huge!

New Glenn will feature a reusable first stage that, according to Blue Origin, will last for 25 missions. They also say that the rocket will be able to launch in 95% of weather conditions, implying that launch schedules will be reliable.

The New Glenn rocket will be taller than any other commercial available vehicle. Image Credit: Blue Origin

New Glenn will reach a towering height of 95 meters (313 ft) which will dwarf any other commercially available vehicle. And it will be capable of delivering 45 metric tons, almost 100,000 pounds, into Low-Earth Orbit (LEO).

Initially, Jeff Bezos said that New Glenn would be ready to launch this year, but where have we heard that before? Now, the company says that it’ll launch with its first payload in 2021.

So far, they only have the main engines and the payload fairing. They’re still working on the rest of the vehicle.

Evan Gough

View Comments

  • Just for kicks, I seem to remember that someone worked out that you can fit a number of SpaceX first _orbital launcher_ Falcon 1 into the cargo compartment of their upcoming fully reusable Starship/SuperHeavy combo. Which may make its first orbital flight this year. So that could beat BO three times over (orbital vs suborbital, fully reusable vs partly reusable, 2020 vs 2021). And eventually cost much less per launched kilogram.

    But it's good that there is competition.

Recent Posts

The UK is Considering Nuclear Propulsion in Space

The UK Space Agency recently contracted with the British Rolls Royce company to research nuclear…

19 hours ago

James Webb Unfolds Sunshield

It’s almost time. Soon the James Webb Space Telescope will be on its way to…

21 hours ago

Thanks to Perseverance, We’re Finally Going to Hear What Mars Sounds Like

Many consider the various rovers we’ve sent to Mars as the next best thing to…

1 day ago

NASA Has Given Up on Trying to Deploy InSight’s Mole

It's always a sad day when a mission comes to an end. And it's even…

2 days ago

Mars is Still an Active World. Here’s a Landslide in Nili Fossae

A image released by the MRO mission shows a landslide near the location where the…

2 days ago

Astronomers see a Hint of the Gravitational Wave Background to the Universe

Astronomers have found evidence of faint gravitational waves using an array of pulsars in our…

2 days ago