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More Great Images of Supernova 2014J Plus View it During Live Webcasts

M82 and Supernova 2014J imaged on January 23, 2014. Credit and copyright: Mick Hyde.

M82 and Supernova 2014J imaged on January 23, 2014. Credit and copyright: Mick Hyde.

Images keep pouring in of the biggest excitement in astronomy this week, a new Type Ia supernova in the Cigar Galaxy, 82, about 12 million light years away. As has been said, the Cigar got lit!

This is the closest supernova of this type since the 1800’s. Astrophotographers have been out in full force trying to nab this event, we’ve got more great images to share today, and we’ll keep adding them as they come in.

If you haven’t been able to take a look for yourself, you can join a live webcast from the folks at the Virtual Telescope Project on Saturday, January 25, 2014 at 20:30 UTC (3 pm EST, 1 pm PST), which you can watch here.

Plus, Fraser and the Virtual Star Party will surely try to nab M82 during their hangout on Sunday January 26 at 9 pm EST. Click the VSP link to find out when it starts in your time zone.

SN2014J on January 23, 2014, as seen from Rhode Island. Credit and copyright: Lloyd Merrill

SN2014J on January 23, 2014, as seen from Rhode Island. Credit and copyright: Lloyd Merrill

M82 with Supernova 2014J imaged on January 23, 2014. Credit and copyright: Anna Morris.

M82 with Supernova 2014J imaged on January 23, 2014. Credit and copyright: Anna Morris.

M82 and SN2014J as seen through a 6 inch telescope on January 23, 2014. Credit and copyright: Bill Magee.

M82 and SN2014J as seen through a 6 inch telescope on January 23, 2014. Credit and copyright: Bill Magee.

Before and after the supernova in M82. Credit and copyright: Astrokid96 on Flickr.

M82 and M81 imaged on January 23, 2014. Credit and copyright: Gregory Hogan.

M82 and M81 imaged on January 23, 2014. Credit and copyright: Gregory Hogan.

Comparison images of M82 nine months apart: on April 4, 2013 and January 23, 2014. Credit and copyright: Paul Campbell.

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About 

Nancy Atkinson is Universe Today's Senior Editor. She also works with Astronomy Cast, and is a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador.

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • ronaldmsonntag January 25, 2014, 3:07 AM

    Went out tonight and spotted the supernova with a 6″ Dobsonian. Particularly thrilling to see two galaxies in one field of view!

  • Matthew Immenschuh January 25, 2014, 8:26 AM

    Wasn’t the nova in Delphinium last year that became naked eye visibile a type 1a?? Article states closest type of nova since 1800??? I thought the nova in Delphinium was within our galaxy. Also, what type was the nova seen in the Southern Hemisphere late last year??? I recall it being quite bright as well.

    • magnus.nyborg January 26, 2014, 8:51 AM

      A nova stems from the explosion on the surface of a white dwarf. The white dwarf then survives the nova-event.
      A supernova type 1a stems from the entire white dwarf obliterating itself, wich requires different starting conditions than a nova.
      They are not the same. While nova’s are quite commonplace, usually a few every year in the milky way alone, supernovas are rare – and much much brighter.

  • The OGS January 25, 2014, 5:32 PM

    I’m… not perceiving the excitement here.
    Is this what you people call exciting? Wow.

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