Categories: Carnival of Space

Carnival of Space #660-661

Welcome to the 660-661st Carnival of Space! The Carnival is a community of space science and astronomy writers and bloggers, who submit their best work each week for your benefit. We have a fantastic roundup today so now, on to this week’s worth of stories!

Universe Today:

The Hill:

Chandra:

Thank you for all of your stories – we’ll see you next week!

And if you’re interested in looking back, here’s an archive to all the past Carnivals of Space. If you’ve got a space-related blog, you should really join the carnival. Just email an entry to susie@wshcrew.space, and the next host will link to it. It will help get awareness out there about your writing, help you meet others in the space community – and community is what blogging is all about. And if you really want to help out, sign up to be a host. Send an email to the above address.

Susie Murph

Susie Murph is the Communications Specialist at CosmoQuest. She also produces Astronomy Cast and the Weekly Space Hangout, and is the former producer of the Parsec Award-winning Guide to Space video series.

Share
Published by
Susie Murph

Recent Posts

Dune-Inspired Stillsuits Could Allow Astronauts to Recycle Their Urine Into Water

If history has taught us one thing, it is that science fiction often gives way…

5 hours ago

A Walking Balloon Could One Day Explore Titan – Or Earth’s Sea Floor

Novel ways to move on other celestial bodies always draw the attention of the space…

14 hours ago

Webb Completes Its Second Year of Operations

What happens when a spiral and an elliptical galaxy collide? To celebrate the second anniversary…

1 day ago

Galaxies Regulate their Own Growth so they Don’t Run Out of Star Forming Gas

Look at most spiral or barred spiral galaxies and you will see multiple regions where…

2 days ago

Mapping the Stars in a Dwarf Galaxy to Reveal its Dark Matter

Dark matter is curious stuff! As the name suggests, it’s dark making it notoriously difficult…

3 days ago

A Close Pulsar Measures 11.4 km Across

When massive stars detonate as supernovae, they leave often behind a pulsar. These fast rotating…

3 days ago