Gallery: 2015 Perseids Are Putting on a Show

Article written: 12 Aug , 2015
Updated: 23 Dec , 2015
by

Have you been looking up the past few nights, trying to see the Perseid Meteor Shower? Many of our readers have been turning their eyes — and cameras — to the skies, with spectacular results. This year’s Perseids were predicted to be one of the best ever, since there has been little to no moonlight to upstage the shower. As you can see from the images here, many astrophotographers were able to capture fast and bright meteors, and even some that left persistent trains.

Remember, tonight (Wednesday, August 12, 2015) is projected to be the peak, so if you’ve got clear skies, take advantage of this opportunity to see a great meteor shower. You can find out how and when to see them in our previous detailed articles by our in-house observing experts David Dickinson and Bob King.

And enjoy the view from our readers in this gallery of 2015 Perseids:

A Perseid Meteor, the Milky Way and the photographer on August 11, 2015 near Bamburgh, Northumberland, England. Credit and copyright:  Peter Greig.

A Perseid Meteor, the Milky Way and the photographer on August 11, 2015 near Bamburgh, Northumberland, England. Credit and copyright:
Peter Greig.

An 'exploding' Perseid meteor as seen on August 11, 2015. Credit and copyright: Chris Lyons.

An ‘exploding’ Perseid meteor as seen on August 11, 2015. Credit and copyright: Chris Lyons.

Bright Perseid and Perseus. Credit and copyright: Chris Lyons.

Bright Perseid and Perseus. Credit and copyright: Chris Lyons.

A green Perseid meteor, along with 2 satellites show up in this image taken on August 11, 2015. Credit and copyright: eos-001 on Flickr.

A green Perseid meteor, along with 2 satellites show up in this image taken on August 11, 2015. Credit and copyright: eos-001 on Flickr.

Perseid meteor from early morning, August 12, 2015 in Weatherly, Pennsylvania. Taken with a Canon 6D and Samyang 14mm lens, 40 second exposure at ISO 3200, unguided. Credit and copyright: Tom Wildoner.

Perseid meteor from early morning, August 12, 2015 in Weatherly, Pennsylvania. Taken with a Canon 6D and Samyang 14mm lens, 40 second exposure at ISO 3200, unguided. Credit and copyright: Tom Wildoner.

Perseid Meteor near Cassiopeia along with the Andromeda Galaxy, as seen from France on August 10, 2015. Credit and copyright: VegaStar Carpentier/ VegaStar Carpentier Photography.

Perseid Meteor near Cassiopeia along with the Andromeda Galaxy, as seen from France on August 10, 2015. Credit and copyright: VegaStar Carpentier/ VegaStar Carpentier Photography.

A Perseid Meteor as seen on August 8, 2015, taken from Oxfordshire with a Canon 1100D + 18-55mm lens, ISO-1600 for 30 seconds. Credit and copyright: Mary Spicer.

A Perseid Meteor as seen on August 8, 2015, taken from Oxfordshire with a Canon 1100D + 18-55mm lens, ISO-1600 for 30 seconds. Credit and copyright: Mary Spicer.

Prolific night sky photographer John Chumack near Dayton, Ohio put together this video of 81 Perseid meteors he captured on August 12, 2015 with his Automated low light -Meteor Video Camera Network:

If you are clouded out, you can still enjoy the shower. NASA TV will be tracking the Perseids live on Wednesday, August 12 starting at 10PM EDT/02:00 UT:

Nancy Atkinson is currently Universe Today’s Contributing Editor. Previously she served as UT’s Senior Editor and lead writer, and has worked with Astronomy Cast and 365 Days of Astronomy. Nancy is the author of the new book “Incredible Stories from Space: A Behind-the-Scenes Look at the Missions Changing Our View of the Cosmos.” She is also a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador.

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1 Response

  1. Member
    Aqua4U says

    We’ll hello there stranger! I miss your posts, so it’s a pleasure seeing you in here again… Did you get a chance to see any of the Perseids last night? I got out at about 10p.m. with my telescope to keep me company. I saw one very bright fireball with a long tail at about 10:30. I kept one eye out for meteors as I explored the summer Milky Way, but didn’t see any others. Then at 11:30 the sky turned milky and by midnight we were completely clouded out. Earlier I’d taken a nap so I could stay up late, so as a result, there I was wide awake and no sky. BUMMAH! I put the scope away and came into the office to listen to the meteors on space weather.com’s radio meteor page. There were tons of soundings, so fur shore someone was seeing them! You? Stayed up until 1 or so, went back out a couple to check for clearing, but it was not to be. Dzzzz…

    Well… there’s always tonight! Which looks like it will be clear? There’s a heat wave due this weekend and sometimes that means we get favorable winds to keep the marine layer offshore… hope so! I want to see some Perseids!

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