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fermilab-collider

New Particle Throws Monkeywrench in Particle Physics

18 Mar , 2009

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The hits just keep on coming from Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. So far this month, the lab has announced the discovery of a rare single top quark, and then narrowed the gaptwice, actually — for the mass of the elusive Higgs Boson particle, or “God particle,” thought to give all other particles their mass. 

Now, scientists have detected a new, completely untheorized particle that challenges what physicists thought they knew about how quarks combine to form matter. They’re calling it Y(4140), reflecting its measured mass of 4140 Mega-electron volts. 

“It must be trying to tell us something,” said Jacobo Konigsberg of the University of Florida, a spokesman for Fermilab’s collider detector team. “So far, we’re not sure what that is, but rest assured we’ll keep on listening.”

particles

The Standard Model of elementary particles and forces includes six quarks, which bind together to form composite particles. Credit: Fermilab

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matter as we know it comprises building blocks called quarks. Quarks fit together in various well-established ways to build other particles: mesons, made of a quark-antiquark pair, and baryons, made of three quarks. 

But recently, electron-positron colliders at Stanford’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Japanese laboratory KEK have revealed examples of composite quark structures — named X and particles — that are not the usual mesons and baryons. And now, the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) collaboration has found evidence for the Y(4140) particle.

The Y(4140) particle decays into a pair of other particles, the J/psi and the phi, suggesting to physicists that it might be a composition of charm and anticharm quarks. However, the characteristics of this decay do not fit the conventional expectations for such a make-up. Other possible interpretations beyond a simple quark-antiquark structure are hybrid particles that also contain gluons, or even four-quark combinations.

The Fermilab scientists observed Y(4140) particles in the decay of a much more commonly produced particle containing a bottom quark, called the B+ meson. Sifting through trillions of proton-antiproton collisions from Fermilab’s Tevatron, they identified a small sampling of B+ mesons that decayed in an unexpected pattern. Further analysis showed that the B+ mesons were decaying into Y(4140).

The Y(4140) particle is the newest member of a family of particles of similar unusual characteristics observed in the last several years by experimenters at Fermilab’s Tevatron as well as at KEK and the SLAC lab, which operates at Stanford through a partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy.

“We congratulate CDF on the first evidence for a new unexpected Y state that decays to J/psi and phi,” said Japanese physicist Masanori Yamauchi, a KEK spokesperson. “This state may be related to the Y(3940) state discovered by Belle and might be another example of an exotic hadron containing charm quarks. We will try to confirm this state in our own Belle data.”

Theoretical physicists are trying to decode the true nature of these exotic combinations of quarks that fall outside our current understanding of mesons and baryons. Meanwhile, experimentalists happily continue to search for more such particles.

“We’re building upon our knowledge piece by piece,” said Fermilab spokesperson Rob Roser, “and with enough pieces, we’ll understand how this puzzle fits together.”

The Y(4140) observation is the subject of an article submitted by CDF to Physical Review Letters this week. Besides announcing Y(4140), the CDF experiment collaboration is presenting more than 40 new results at the Moriond Conference on Quantum Chromodynamics in Europe this week, including the discovery of electroweak top-quark production and a new limit on the Higgs boson, in concert with experimenters from Fermilab’s DZero collaboration. 

Source: Fermilab


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tacitus
Member
March 18, 2009 12:44 PM

Cue the silly comments about the whole edifice of theoretical physics being about to collapse and that a bunch of know-nothings with easily debunked theories about the Electric Universe and non-existent gravity were right all along….

3… 2… 1…

hambone
Guest
hambone
March 18, 2009 12:51 PM

I’m sure they know what it is and have an answer soon, otherwise, the freaks from the anti-science group ‘the crazy scientist made a black hole that will swallow Earth’ will come out of the woodworks. Lol. Great things comes out of research of the sub-atomic particles.

OilIsSlippery
Guest
OilIsSlippery
March 18, 2009 1:10 PM

This willingness to accept new evidence and build upon proven models in mainstream science is “utterly stupid”
We need a new paradigm because of the dogma and bias that doesn’t backup up by evidence of my world view.
I am a hedge fund manager, so you know you can trust my judgement.
If you look on youtube and various blogs, you will see that there is loads stuff that people go on about, even by guys from the IEEE (if you cant trust a guy who can wire a plug then who can you trust? )
Remember they said “insert favourite scientist” was mad/wrong/a witch

Yours

Oil
EU PC forever!!!!!!!

Total Science
Member
March 18, 2009 1:34 PM
LOL. “Now, scientists have detected a new, completely untheorized particle that challenges what physicists thought they knew about how quarks combine to form matter.” Untheorized? You mean Newton’s so-called “law of univeral gravitation” and Einstein’s General Relativity didn’t predict this particle? I thought Feynman and Hawking said we already know everything there is to know about the universe. “We may now be near the end of the search for the ultimate laws of nature.” — Stephen W. Hawking, mathematician, 1988 “We do not need a new theory because our present one explains everything.” — Richard P. Feynman, physicist, 1988 “They’re calling it Y(4140), reflecting its measured mass of 4140 Mega-electron volts.” Electon volts? What’s that? Is that like… Read more »
Freiddie
Member
March 18, 2009 2:16 PM

I can’t tell if OillsMastery is being ironic or what.

In any case, this sure is an excellent discovery… at least physicists have more data to chew on (and more theory to work on) before the LHC begins.

Mr. Obvious
Guest
Mr. Obvious
March 18, 2009 2:39 PM

Oills you tard.
General Relativity is about physics of the very large… like your mouth.

You might say Einstein tried to bring your mouth and brain together in his never ending task to find the theory of everything. Finding a binding law of physics which worked with the very small (i.e. your brain), and the very large (i.e. your mouth).

Ha! Now that is funny.

solrey
Member
March 18, 2009 2:52 PM
‘Quarks’ are quantified by charge state and voltage potential. Meaning that kinetic electro-magnetic forces are the foundation of all matter. We observe EM forces everywhere, but cosmologists mostly ignore them in space. No wonder they’re confused over most of the latest observations the past few years. There was an article a few days ago about capturing and holding an ‘exciton’ with a ‘quantum donut’ in a tuned EM field. They discovered that finesse triumphed over brute force. Particle accelerators basically use brute force to more or less ‘smash rocks together’. The result is a random assortment (some predicted, many not) of out-of-sync, resonant energy states that near instantaneously condense back into a state of equilibrium. Perhaps if they… Read more »
Olaf
Member
Olaf
March 18, 2009 2:53 PM

Cool! I love suprises, especially when they are new partilces!

Then again it might be a fluke, bug in the software, faulty detector,… So we need independend confirmations, maybe by the LHC.

This only shows that although Standard model might not be complete, it does prove that EU is BS since EU cannot predict this at all.

In my opinion, EU is for sissies that are not inteligent enough to realize that they are misguided. :-p :-p :-p

Olaf
Member
Olaf
March 18, 2009 2:57 PM

Coukd it be som rare interaction with the dark matter that produced this particle?

Crackpot
Guest
Crackpot
March 18, 2009 3:04 PM

Quote: “It must be trying to tell us something,” said Jacobo Konigsberg of the University of Florida, a spokesman for Fermilab’s collider detector team. “So far, we’re not sure what that is, but rest assured we’ll keep on listening.”

The particle is obviously screaming: “Heeeelp! Free me from the chains of the Standard Model! I am just a simple looping EM wave …”

http://classicalatom.blogspot.com/2008/09/simple-model-of-electrons-protons.html

wink

Astrofiend
Member
Astrofiend
March 18, 2009 3:43 PM

Awesome – it’d be great if this was some sort of pointer towards what’s next – a clue to telling us how the Standard Model needs to be modified. The damn thing has had so much success. Too much success. I want inconsistencies. I want the cracks to appear because we know this isn’t the end of the story!

And bloody well Fermilab – I think they must be on their big push to get results published before LHC comes and dwarfs their energy aspirations.

Andrew
Member
Andrew
March 18, 2009 3:46 PM

Did Fermilab recent get a dose of slick new analysis software or something? These consecutive findings otherwise seem really out of the ordinary pace of discovery.

Total Science
Member
March 18, 2009 3:47 PM

Solrey,

“@oillslippery
You should thank electrical engineers for designing most of the modern technology you use and enjoy everyday, including your ability to ridicule them on your computer over the internet.”

Now THAT is funny!

solrey
Member
March 18, 2009 3:53 PM

crackpot, thanks for the link. If that’s correct, then my idea of studying these ‘particles’ with tuned EM fields is probably accurate, as opposed to just smashing them together.
That would also corroborate the derivative of Langmuir Law being applied to the ‘quantum’ realm, demonstrating plasma physics being scalar through the smallest to the largest structures.

But I’m sure none of this has anything to do with EU. wink

Davidlpf
Guest
Davidlpf
March 18, 2009 3:53 PM

@OIM and sorley
Everytime you say something just proves why science should be left to scientists.

RN
Guest
RN
March 18, 2009 4:13 PM

@Davidlpf

Amen. (In an universal and non-christian way.)

Sci-Fi Si
Guest
March 18, 2009 4:29 PM
The history of science is littered with statements like “We have physics wrapped up to the 6th decimal place” and then wham, bam! “Just dotting the i’s and crossing the t’s”, but I do appreciate their honesty and commitment – It just wouldn’t be scientific otherwise. It’s stuff like this that makes physics so exciting for me. How boring would life be if we could calculate the outcome of everything just by pressing a few buttons on a calculator and we knew the exact limits of what is and isn’t possible… I wonder what the ‘M’ theorists will make of this? The Y(4140) is a great discovery. Fermilab have done an absolutely stunning job, this month has been… Read more »
Total Science
Member
March 18, 2009 4:42 PM

Olaf,

“Coukd it be som rare interaction with the dark matter that produced this particle?”

Yup.

We observed the Dark Matter in Meinong’s Jungle. It was obscuring the invisible pink unicorns aboard Noah’s Ark.

Ravenas
Guest
Ravenas
March 18, 2009 5:21 PM

gosh i cant believe OiM is still here… >.< someone has to implement an option in this blog to shun out comments if the reader prefers to. Otherwise, it’s such a pain to read this blog full of biased deluded commentators…

John Kennell
Guest
March 18, 2009 6:56 PM

I wish you dorks would stop using the phrase ‘god particle,’ for chrissake. If god is a particle, and we can measure it/him, then guess what, he/it is no god.

Please stop giving the fundies more ammo. Thanks.

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