Rosetta’s Comet, Now in 3-D

by Nancy Atkinson on August 14, 2014

A 3-D image from the Rosetta spacecraft showing Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and its boulder-strewn 'neck' region. Also visible is an exposed cliff face and numerous crater-like depressions. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA.

A 3-D image from the Rosetta spacecraft showing Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and its boulder-strewn ‘neck’ region. Also visible is an exposed cliff face and numerous crater-like depressions. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA.

You always have a pair of those cardboard red-blue 3-D glasses by your desk, right? Well, grab them and take a look at this view of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, just out from the Rosetta mission team. It almost feels like you’re right there with the spacecraft.

Notice the cliffs (see the exposed layers there?), boulders and depressions. The 3-D image was created using two images (you can see the two images here at the ESA blog) They were both taken on 7 August 2014, from a distance of 104 kilometres through the orange filter of the OSIRIS narrow-angle camera. ESA says the two images are separated by 17 minutes and the exposure time is 138 milliseconds.

About 

Nancy Atkinson is Universe Today's Senior Editor. She also works with Astronomy Cast, and is a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador.

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