The November 3, 2013 partial solar eclipse with mirage from Sullivan's Island, South Carolina. Credit and copyright: Jeff Jackson

Hybrid Solar Eclipse Images from Around the World, November 3, 2013

Article Updated: 23 Dec , 2015
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Many lucky people around the world were treated to a an unusual “hybrid” solar eclipse today — so called because the extent to which the Sun was blocked out varied around the world. Those along North America’s east coast and the northern half of South America saw a brilliant Sun partially eclipsed by the Moon just at dawn, as in our lead image from South Carolina, USA. But regions like equatorial Africa had a total eclipsed Sun for about a minute, while those in southern Europe, the Middle East, were able to see an “annular” or partial, eclipse. This type of variable eclipse is rare — the last time one occurred was Nov. 20, 1854 and the next one won’t happen until Oct. 17, 2172! This was also the last eclipse of the year, and photographers were out to capture the views.

UPDATE: We’ve now added more images, including this new one from Uganda that shows totality:

The moment of totality of the Nov. 3, 2013 solar eclipse, as viewed from Owiny Village in Uganda.  The photo was taken with a Canon Rebel T1i camera, using a Tamron f/2.8 28-75mm lens, unfiltered. Credit and copyright: Helen Lin.

The moment of totality of the Nov. 3, 2013 solar eclipse, as viewed from Owiny Village in Uganda. The photo was taken with a Canon Rebel T1i camera, using a Tamron f/2.8 28-75mm lens, unfiltered. Credit and copyright: Helen Lin.

See more below, and we’ll continue to add images as they come in.

Here’s a gorgeous timelapse by Steve Ellington, who shot this from the US east coast:

The Nov. 3, 2013 partial solar eclipse observed and captured from Malta. Credit and copyright: Leonard E. Mercer.

The Nov. 3, 2013 partial solar eclipse observed and captured from Malta. Credit and copyright: Leonard E. Mercer.

The partial eclipse of the Sun as seen from Saida, Lebanon on 3/11/2013. The pictures span the beginning to the maximum eclipse as seen from this location. This eclipse was a rare "hybrid" eclipse, appearing as either an annular or total eclipse from different locations on Earth. These images were taken with an 8 inch Schmidt Cassegrain Telescope fitted, of course, with a solar filter. Credit and copyright: Ziad El-Zaatari

The partial eclipse of the Sun as seen from Saida, Lebanon on 3/11/2013. The pictures span the beginning to the maximum eclipse as seen from this location. This eclipse was a rare “hybrid” eclipse, appearing as either an annular or total eclipse from different locations on Earth. These images were taken with an 8 inch Schmidt Cassegrain Telescope fitted, of course, with a solar filter. Credit and copyright: Ziad El-Zaatari

The following two images were sent to us by Victor Pinheiro from Espargos, Sal Island, one of 10 islands that make up the Republic of Cabo Verde, in the central Atlantic Ocean, 570 kilometers off the coast of Western Africa. Africa had some of the best views of the eclipse, with some areas seeing totality.

This image of the Nov. 3, 2013 solar eclipse was taken from the city of Espargos on the island of Sal, one of the island that make up the archipelago of the Republic of Capo Verde, off the coast of Africa.  Equipment: Canon PowerShot SX10 IS, with window film to reduce light. Credit and copyright: Victor Pinheiro.

This image of the Nov. 3, 2013 solar eclipse was taken from the city of Espargos on the island of Sal, one of the island that make up the archipelago of the Republic of Capo Verde, off the coast of Africa. Equipment: Canon PowerShot SX10 IS, with window film to reduce light. Credit and copyright: Victor Pinheiro.

Another image of the Nov. 3 solar eclipse taken from the island of Sal, Republic of Cape Verde, off the coast of Africa, using a different color window film. Credit and copyright: Victor Pinheiro.

Another image of the Nov. 3 solar eclipse taken from the island of Sal, Republic of Cape Verde, off the coast of Africa, using a different color window film. Credit and copyright: Victor Pinheiro.

The partial solar eclipse on Nov. 3, 2013 at its peak over Israel. Credit and copyright: Gadi Eidelheit.

The partial solar eclipse on Nov. 3, 2013 at its peak over Israel. Credit and copyright: Gadi Eidelheit.

The image above and below were captured by Gadi Eidelheit from Israel. You can see his entire collection of images from the eclipse at his website.

Another view of the Nov. 3, 2013 partial solar eclipse as seen from Israel. Credit and copyright: Gadi Eidelheit.

Another view of the Nov. 3, 2013 partial solar eclipse as seen from Israel. Credit and copyright: Gadi Eidelheit.

A spectacular 'mirage' view of the partial solar eclipse rising into the clouds, as seen from Fort Pierce, Florida, on  November 3, 2013. Credit and copyright: John O'Connor/nasatech.

A spectacular ‘mirage’ view of the partial solar eclipse rising into the clouds, as seen from Fort Pierce, Florida, on November 3, 2013. Credit and copyright: John O’Connor/nasatech.

A partially eclipsed Sun rises over the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 3, 2013. Credit and copyright: David Dickinson.

A partially eclipsed Sun rises over the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 3, 2013. Credit and copyright: David Dickinson.

The partial hybrid solar eclipse of November 3, 2013 was photographed through intermittent cloud cover over a wheat field in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 'I was anxiously awaiting a break in the cloud cover to get a clear shot; suddenly, about fifteen minutes from the conclusion, a small clearing made the partial eclipse visible. The colors of the clouds and sunrise made this a morning I will not forget!' Credit and copyright: Marion Haligowski.

The partial hybrid solar eclipse of November 3, 2013 was photographed through intermittent cloud cover over a wheat field in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. ‘I was anxiously awaiting a break in the cloud cover to get a clear shot; suddenly, about fifteen minutes from the conclusion, a small clearing made the partial eclipse visible. The colors of the clouds and sunrise made this a morning I will not forget!’ Credit and copyright: Marion Haligowski.

The eclipsed Sun, with sunspots, as seen from Madrid, Spain. Credit and copyright: Álvaro Ibáñez.

The eclipsed Sun, with sunspots, as seen from Madrid, Spain. Credit and copyright: Álvaro Ibáñez.

The Nov. 3, 2013  eclipse seen from Johannesburg, South Africa taken handheld with a Canon 5D mkII and 24-70mm lens and neutral density filter. Credit and copyright: Cory Schmitz

The Nov. 3, 2013 eclipse seen from Johannesburg, South Africa taken handheld with a Canon 5D mkII and 24-70mm lens and neutral density filter. Credit and copyright: Cory Schmitz

The partially eclipsed Sun disappearing into the clouds, as seen from New York City, Nov. 3, 2013 at 6:30 A.M. Credit and copyright: Ben Berry.

The partially eclipsed Sun disappearing into the clouds, as seen from New York City, Nov. 3, 2013 at 6:30 A.M. Credit and copyright: Ben Berry.

About 3% of the Sun is 'missing' in this picturesque view of the hybrid solar eclipse on Nov. 3, 2013, as seen from Ankara, Turkey. Credit and copyright: Yüksel Kenaroglu.

About 3% of the Sun is ‘missing’ in this picturesque view of the hybrid solar eclipse on Nov. 3, 2013, as seen from Ankara, Turkey. Credit and copyright: Yüksel Kenaroglu.

Solar eclipse New York Sunrise November 3, 2013,  taken near JFK Airport and the Cross Bay Bridge. Credit and copyright: astroval1 on Flickr.

Solar eclipse New York Sunrise November 3, 2013, taken near JFK Airport and the Cross Bay Bridge. Credit and copyright: astroval1 on Flickr.

The Nov. 3 partial solar eclipse as seen from Long Branch beach, New Jersey, taken with a Canon Rebel T2i camera 250 mm zoom. Credit and copyright: Jennifer Khordi.

The Nov. 3 partial solar eclipse as seen from Long Branch beach, New Jersey, taken with a Canon Rebel T2i camera 250 mm zoom. Credit and copyright: Jennifer Khordi.

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19 Responses

  1. Hazel Lewry says:

    Fabulous! We had heavy cloud cover in this part of the northern Caribbean!

  2. Rissah Mae Zerna Sibul says:

    bawal ba sa buntis and solar eclipse?

  3. Gadi Eidelheit says:

    Thank you for posting my pictures. I am very pleased and attached to be part of something so global as people from America, Africa, Europe and Asia observed this eclipse

  4. Mary Ann Leverence says:

    Really gorgeous pictures!! Thank you so much to all who took the time and effort to bring so much pleasure to us all.

  5. Melvina Roselyn says:

    I have yet to see a real good solar eclipse.

  6. JM says:

    One of the nicer one’s I’ve seen…from above Uganda

    http://nicmosis.as.arizona.edu:8000/ECLIPSE_WEB/ECLIPSE_13/TSE2013_CB.jpg

  7. Jeff Minch says:

    It’s like the moon was doing the ultimate photobomb.

  8. muhirwe caroline says:

    so amazing woooow sori 4 those who weren’t there

  9. FaCu says:

    incredible.. Beatiful!!

  10. JonHanford says:

    Wow, Bailey’s Beads around the entire circumference of the moon in Helen Lin’s photo of totality. A sign that the moon barely covered the disk of the sun, as would be expected in a hybrid annular-total eclipse like this one.

  11. Richard says:

    I saw one very similar to the one Victor Pinheiro shot, from the front of my house in Abuja, Nigeria. Awesome view. Gave a quiet, calm shade on earth.

  12. lianejaunty says:

    good picture,but we couldn’t see it in China,wish next time

  13. JustMe says:

    As seen above Gaborone, Botswana, Southern Africa

  14. Tswana says:

    Seen in Botswana as well..

  15. indrek says:

    in case anyone is interested – here are some pics from off the coast of gabon – as the eclipse arrived in Africa. you are welcome 🙂

    https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151714057592045.1073741828.694652044&type=1&l=b46d043d4e

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