The Cassini Image Hall of Fame

Article written: 25 Sep , 2011
Updated: 24 Dec , 2015
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If you’re reading this, you’re probably very well aware of the Cassini mission. Launched in 1997, the Cassini spacecraft arrived at Saturn in June of 2004 and has been faithfully returning image after beautiful image of Saturn, its rings and its very extended family of moons ever since – not to mention all the groundbreaking scientific discoveries it’s made about the Saturnian system… and our solar system as a whole. Cassini truly is a rock star in the world of robotic space exploration, and now it has its own Hall of Fame to show off some of its best work!

The Cassini mission site put up by JPL/Caltech regularly features news and images from the mission, even including the latest downlinked raw image data from the spacecraft. In this way anyone can keep up with what Cassini is seeing and when, far before the images are included in NASA’s Planetary Data System. The new Cassini Image Hall of Fame showcases the “best of the best” from the mission, and is a great way to revisit Cassini’s past discoveries. (With so much happening at Saturn, sometimes it’s easy to forget all the amazing things Cassini has brought to our attention!)

Revisit the best of the best images of Saturn

If you’re a fan of Saturn (and really, who isn’t?) be sure to check this out. With the current mission extended into 2017 there’s sure to be lots more additions to the Hall of Fame on the way, too!

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colorado.

Click here to see the Hall of Fame images.

Also, be sure to visit the hard-working Cassini imaging team’s homepage at http://ciclops.org… they are the ones responsible for all these fantastic images in the first place!

 

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