Hubble Roadshow Kickstarter Project

Article written: 30 Aug , 2011
Updated: 26 Apr , 2016
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I love Kickstarter projects, and I love space. So here’s something that puts them both together: the Hubble Roadshow Kickstarter project. If they can raise $20,000, this group will tour the US in a custom RV showing the new documentary, Saving Hubble. They’ll organize telescopes, parties… even jugglers.

So if this sounds like a project worth backing, go ahead and kick them a few bucks. And then show up and celebrate Hubble when they pass through your town.


5 Responses

  1. John Fleming says

    Yes, it takes great pictures of the universe. However, when NASA shot the moon with Hubble, they only showed us black and white photographs. Where are the color photos of the Moon by Hubble?

    • WaxyMary says

      The moon presents a problem much like any other fast moving (in relation to the Hubble Space Telescope) object we have attempted to image. The need for three filters for the three different exposures used in obtaining color images restricts the actual time for each image’s light collection. Time-on-target enhances the ability of any telescope to gather light.

      This time-on-image for the CCD imaging chip (charge-coupled device) results in poor image quality, and if any image is made with a greater time allotment the target’s movement blurs the resultant image. If the image is subject to degrading from ToT as well as being too bright, too close, and too fast moving I think you can see where the problem lies. You never see a image taken by the HST of any of the shuttles for example.

      Using a composite camera is out of the question because the HST has no such camera. All images which you see as color are multiple exposures using filters of large and varied types. You can read much more about how the HST works at the following Wiki article.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hubble_Space_Telescope

      Mary

      • Member
        Anonymous says

        In addition, John, if you are looking for great closeup images of the Moon (including views of the Apollo landing sites, if that is what your comment is about) take a look at the spectacular images from a spacecraft and camera built especially to take images of the Moon: The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. They have a ton of images at the LROC website: http://www.lroc.asu.edu/

    • WaxyMary says

      The moon presents a problem much like any other fast moving (in relation to the Hubble Space Telescope) object we have attempted to image. The need for three filters for the three different exposures used in obtaining color images restricts the actual time for each image’s light collection. Time-on-target enhances the ability of any telescope to gather light.

      This time-on-image for the CCD imaging chip (charge-coupled device) results in poor image quality, and if any image is made with a greater time allotment the target’s movement blurs the resultant image. If the image is subject to degrading from ToT as well as being too bright, too close, and too fast moving I think you can see where the problem lies. You never see a image taken by the HST of any of the shuttles for example.

      Using a composite camera is out of the question because the HST has no such camera. All images which you see as color are multiple exposures using filters of large and varied types. You can read much more about how the HST works at the following Wiki article.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hubble_Space_Telescope

      Mary

  2. Beau Hartweg says

    As a member of an amateur astronomy club, this sounds like a great idea. I hope they get the funds they need.

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