Infrared Moonset

Article written: 25 Sep , 2009
Updated: 24 Dec , 2015
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When it comes to the Moon, there are times when I feel like the “Queen of Selene”. In just a few short weeks there will be a whole new style of lunar observing book out on the market, and just when I thought I’d heard it all and seen it all… along comes something new! While the header photograph on this article is absolutely spectacular, you’re going to go about your day (and night) smiling if you stop to take a look at what’s inside…

After spending an entire weekend with close friend, professional astronomer and member of the USGS team – Brent Archinal – who has been mapping out the information from the LRO, I’ve been in a real “Moon” mindset. Even our UT articles have seemed to have been geared towards our nearest astronomical neighbor, too! So, it just stands to reason that others might be feeling the call of lunacy as well. As it just so happens, one of the most prolific, dedicated and innovative astrophotographers I know – Joe Brimacombe – wasn’t cursing the Moon for re-appearing this month… He was celebrating it. Using a variety of techniques, he’s captured one of the most unique sets of sequences I’ve ever seen and I just had to share it with you!

“On the 20th September 2009 a crescent Moon set over the mountains behind Cairns and was captured in all its glory from Coral Towers Observatory using a variety of infrared cameras.” said Dr. Brimacombe, “These recordings not only show a majestic Moonset, but also the dramatic retrograde motion of the Moon against the fixed background of stars over a mere six minute period.”

This is simply one of those videos that were too good to go left unnoticed. Not only did it appeal to my scientific side, but it totally restored my faith that others can not only be creative and innovative – but know how to have fun, too!

I hope you enjoyed…

“Infrared Moonset” photo and video are courtesy, credit and copyright of Joe Brimacombe – Southerngalactic Imagers.


2 Responses

  1. Sili says

    Dr Brimacombe is also a very generous donor to the 365 Days of Astronomy podcast.

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