Podcast: The Life of Other Stars

Article written: 10 Oct , 2008
Updated: 24 Dec , 2015
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Last week we looked at the complete life of the Sun, birth to death. But stars can be smaller, and stars can get much much larger. And with a change in mass, their lives change too. Let’s start the clock again, and see what happens to the smallest stars in the Universe; and what happens to the largest.

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The Life of Other Stars – Transcript and show notes.


4 Responses

  1. Big Chimpin says

    Astronomy Cast episode 98 is about quasars.

    Check it out at::

    http://media.libsyn.com/media/astronomycast/AstroCast-080721.mp3

    Hope this helps.

  2. Apidcloud says

    Well, i couldnt download it, but i wont be surprised if its fantastic.
    One thing I wanna ask, is that at my class, we are learning about the Universe, and I wonder if someone could do something about quasars here.. I mean, Hearth, some time ago, had an quasar emiting light to there, and some time after that, a mirror as been created… I don´t know the name of that “mirror” and that´s why im asking for an topic talking about quasars and their consequences…
    Thank you all, and help me..

  3. Apidcloud says

    well, i think yes, but im still trying to see the video..
    but i will say something when its finished..
    thank you

  4. AndJames says

    Well written, well presented and is quite concise. This is one of the best of all the podcasts you have presented here, and marries in well with the solar podcast on the life and times of the Sun.

    The only minor detraction I could think of is the relationship to the transitions to variable stars. Ie Cepheids, whose variations are caused by the acoustical changes in the energy process directly due to hydrogen depletion. Trivial perhaps, but a good avenue to understand more advanced stellar evolution theory.

    This should be recommended hearing / reading for all amateur astronomers, and a great educational tool.

    Well done!

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