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Surprise: Earth Is Hit By a Lot More Asteroids Than You Thought

by Jason Major April 22, 2014

Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter “The fact that none of these asteroid impacts shown in the video was detected in advance is proof that the only thing preventing a catastrophe from a ‘city-killer’ sized asteroid is blind luck.” – Ed Lu, B612 Foundation CEO and former […]

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Watch This Asteroid Not Hit Earth

by Jason Major November 26, 2013

Earlier today the near-Earth asteroid 2013 NJ sailed by, coming as close as 2.5 lunar distances — about 960,000 km/596,500 miles. That’s a relatively close call, in astronomical terms, but still decidedly a miss (if you hadn’t already noticed.) Which is a good thing since 2013 NJ is estimated to be anywhere from 120–260 meters […]

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“Oddball” Asteroid is Really a Comet

by Jason Major September 10, 2013

It’s a case of mistaken identity: a near-Earth asteroid with a peculiar orbit turns out not to be an asteroid at all, but a comet… and not some Sun-dried burnt-out briquette either but an actual active comet containing rock and dust as well as CO2 and water ice. The discovery not only realizes the true nature of […]

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A Parting Look at 2012 DA14: Was This a Warning Shot from Space?

by Jason Major February 18, 2013

Just as anticipated, on Friday, Feb. 15, asteroid 2012 DA14 passed us by, zipping 27,000 kilometers (17,000 miles) above Earth’s surface — well within the ring of geostationary weather and communications satellites that ring our world. Traveling a breakneck 28,100 km/hr (that’s nearly five miles a second!) the 50-meter space rock was a fast-moving target for […]

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In Two Weeks This 50-Meter Asteroid Will Buzz Our Planet

by Jason Major January 30, 2013

 Asteroid 2012-DA14 will pass Earth closely on Feb. 15, 2013 (NASA) On February 15 a chunk of rock about 50 meters wide will whiz by Earth at nearly 8 km/s, coming within 27,680 km of our planet’s surface — closer than many weather and communications satellites. For those of you more comfortable with imperial units, […]

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