galaxy cluster

Mapping Dark Matter 4.5 Billion Light-years Away

by Shannon Hall July 25, 2014

The Milky Way measures 100 to 120 thousand light-years across, a distance that defies imagination. But clusters of galaxies, which comprise hundreds to thousands of galaxies swarming under a collective gravitational pull, can span tens of millions of light-years. These massive clusters are a complex interplay between colliding galaxies and dark matter. They seem impossible […]

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Teamwork! Two Telescopes Combine Forces To Spot Distant Galaxy Clusters

by Elizabeth Howell February 12, 2014

Doing something extraordinary often requires teamwork for humans, and the same can be said for telescopes. Witness the success of the Herschel and Planck observatories, whose data was combined in such a way to spot four galaxy clusters 10 billion years away — an era when the universe was just getting started. Now that they […]

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Found! Distant Galaxy Spotted Just 650 Million Years After Big Bang

by Elizabeth Howell February 10, 2014

Peering deep into the universe with the Hubble Space Telescope, a team of researchers have found an extremely distant galaxy. It was discovered in Abell 2744, a galaxy cluster. The galaxy (called Abell2744_Y1) was spotted at a time when it was just 650 million years after the universe-forming Big Bang (which makes it more than 13 […]

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Where Is Dark Matter Most Dense? Subaru Telescope Gets Some Hints

by Elizabeth Howell June 13, 2013

Put another checkmark beside the “cold dark matter” theory. New observations by Japan’s Subaru Telescope are helping astronomers get a grip on the density of dark matter, this mysterious substance that pervades the universe. We can’t see dark matter, which makes up an estimated 85 percent of the universe, but scientists can certainly measure its […]

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Polar Telescope Casts New Light On Dark Energy And Neutrino Mass

by Jason Major April 5, 2012

Located at the southermost point on Earth, the 280-ton, 10-meter-wide South Pole Telescope has helped astronomers unravel the nature of dark energy and zero in on the actual mass of neutrinos — elusive subatomic particles that pervade the Universe and, until very recently, were thought to be entirely without measureable mass. Jason Major on Google+

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