Mass of Uranus

by Fraser Cain on October 1, 2008

Uranus Compared to Earth. Image credit: NASA

Uranus Compared to Earth. Image credit: NASA


The mass of Uranus is 8.68 x 1025 kg.

Want to put that in perspective? That’s 14.536 times more than the mass of Earth. That makes Uranus a pretty massive world, but it’s actually just a tiny fraction of Jupiter. Jupiter is 21.9 times more massive than Uranus.

Even though Uranus is much more massive than Earth, it has a fairly low density. in fact, it’s the second lowest density in the Solar System; only 1.27 g/cm3. If you could stand on the surface of Uranus (you can’t… don’t try), would experience only 89% the force of gravity that you would experience on Earth.

If you could peer inside Uranus, you would discover that most of the planet consists of ices, like water, ammonia and methane.

Here’s an interesting article about the mass of Mercury. And here’s an article about the mass of Jupiter.

If you’d like more info on Uranus, check out Hubblesite’s News Releases about Uranus. And here’s a link to the NASA’s Solar System Exploration Guide to Uranus.

We have recorded an episode of Astronomy Cast just about Uranus. You can access it here: Episode 62: Uranus.

About 

Fraser Cain is the publisher of Universe Today. He's also the co-host of Astronomy Cast with Dr. Pamela Gay.

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