Pictures of Saturn

by Fraser Cain on July 7, 2008

Saturn is easily the most beautiful planet in the Solar System. To celebrate this natural wonder, lets look at some beautiful pics of Saturn.

But if you want to see Saturn by yourself, you can check out these cool telescopes that will help you see the beauty of planet Saturn.


Cassini\'s image of Saturn and Earth. Image credit: NASA/JPL

Let’s start with one of the most beautiful photos of Saturn ever taken. This image of Saturn was taken by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft when it was behind Saturn. In other words, the Sun is completely obscured by Saturn, and illuminating it from behind. The tiny speck in the upper, left-hand side of Saturn’s rings is our own home planet Earth.


Saturn in Infrared. Image credit: Keck

This is a picture of Saturn taken by the ground-based Keck telescope, located atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii. It’s one of the most powerful telescopes on Earth. The Saturn photo was taken in infrared, and shows the strange hot spot located at Saturn’s south pole.


Pioneer\'s image of Saturn. Image credit: NASA/JPL

It’s not the best picture, but you’re looking at one of the first ever images of Saturn captured up close by NASA’s Pioneer 11. During its mission, Pioneer 11 passed just 20,000 km above the cloud tops of Saturn, and captured the first close-up images of Saturn.


Saturn captured by Voyager. Image credit: NASA/JPL

This is an example of a beautiful picture of Saturn taken by NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft in 1980. As you can see, the quality has improved significantly over the image captured by Pioneer 11. Both Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 made quick flybys of Saturn and then sped off into space. When Voyager 1 completed its flyby of Saturn, it sped off into the depths of space, while Voyager 2 went on to visit Uranus and Neptune as part of its Grand Tour of the Solar System.


Saturn, seen by Cassini. Image credit: NASA/JPL/SSI

Here’s another image of Saturn captured by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft. This photograph was taken in May 2004, when Cassini had almost arrived at Saturn. The spacecraft spent another 4 years orbiting Saturn as part of its primary mission, and at the time of this writing, it’s still going strong.

We have written many articles about Saturn for Universe Today. Here are some facts about Saturn.

About 

Fraser Cain is the publisher of Universe Today. He's also the co-host of Astronomy Cast with Dr. Pamela Gay.

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