Astrophotos: Latest Images and Videos of Comet PANSTARRS

by Nancy Atkinson on March 15, 2013

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C/2011 L4 (PANSTARRS on March 14, 2013. Taken in Hachimantai City Japan. Credit and copyright: Jason Hill.

C/2011 L4 (PANSTARRS on March 14, 2013. Taken in Hachimantai City Japan. Credit and copyright: Jason Hill.

You want images and videos of Comet C/2011 L4 (PANSTARRS)? We’ve got ‘em! We’ll start with this stunning view from Japan, taken by Jason Hill. But there’s lots more below:


A first capture of Comet PANSTARRS on March 14, 2013. Credit and copyright: Adam Wipp.

A first capture of Comet PANSTARRS on March 14, 2013. Credit and copyright: Adam Wipp.

Another first view of Comet PANSTARRS from Valencia, Spain on March 14, 2013. Credit and copyright: Alejandro Garcia.

Another first view of Comet PANSTARRS from Valencia, Spain on March 14, 2013. Credit and copyright: Alejandro Garcia.

This timelapse comes from Andrew Takano, a graduate student at the University of Texas at Austin:

Another great timelapse comes from a public observaing event in Greece, sent to us by J.D Strikis and the Hellenic Amateur Astronomy Association:

Comet PanStarrs C/2012 L4 Public Observing in Greece from J.D.Strikis on Vimeo.

Comet PANSTARRS on March 14, 2013, as seen in the Arizona skies. Credit and copyright: Chris Schur.

Comet PANSTARRS on March 14, 2013, as seen in the Arizona skies. Credit and copyright: Chris Schur.

Photographer Chris Schur said last night’s views were “the best and brightest comet yet in the western Arizona Sunset sky!” Schur said via email. “I was able to go much deeper tonight using an 80mm Zeiss refractor and Canon Xti. The head shows more fan like protrusions, and the tail is now really shaping up. … The comet here at our elevation of 5150 feet was very easy to see the entire time it was up, and I would rate it at first magnitude for sure.”

Comet PANSTARRS as seen from  Aarhus, Denmark (56.2 N, 10.2 E). Credit and copyright: Jens Riggelsen.

Comet PANSTARRS as seen from Aarhus, Denmark (56.2 N, 10.2 E). Credit and copyright: Jens Riggelsen.

Comet Panstarrs above Boulder, Colorado on the evening of March 13, 2013, courtesy of Patrick Cullis:

Comet Panstarrs – March 13, 2013 from Patrick Cullis on Vimeo.

Comet PANSTARRS on March 13, 2013 as see from Newington, New Hampshire, USA. Credit and copyright: John Gianforte (theskyguy.org)

Comet PANSTARRS on March 13, 2013 as see from Newington, New Hampshire, USA. Credit and copyright: John Gianforte (theskyguy.org)

Comet PANSTARRS seen from Oakland, California.  The Port of Oakland and the Bay Bridge are in the foreground with the comet and crescent moon in the background. Taken on March 12, 2013. Credit and copyright: Jared Wilson.

Comet PANSTARRS seen from Oakland, California. The Port of Oakland and the Bay Bridge are in the foreground with the comet and crescent moon in the background. Taken on March 12, 2013. Credit and copyright: Jared Wilson.

Comet C/2011 L4 (PANSTARRS) floats in the twilight sky over the lighthouses and pier at Grand Haven State Park in Grand Haven, Michigan on March 13, 2013. Credit and copyright: Kevin's Stuff on Flickr.

Comet C/2011 L4 (PANSTARRS) floats in the twilight sky over the lighthouses and pier at Grand Haven State Park in Grand Haven, Michigan on March 13, 2013. Credit and copyright: Kevin’s Stuff on Flickr.

Comet PANSTARRS and a 5% illuminated Moon on March 13, 2013. Credit and copyright: Tavi Greiner.

Comet PANSTARRS and a 5% illuminated Moon on March 13, 2013. Credit and copyright: Tavi Greiner.

You can see more at our Flickr page, and we’ll keep adding and posting! Thanks to everyone who has been so generous with sharing their great photos and videos.

Want to get your astrophoto featured on Universe Today? Join our Flickr group or send us your images by email (this means you’re giving us permission to post them). Please explain what’s in the picture, when you took it, the equipment you used, etc.

About 

Nancy Atkinson is Universe Today's Senior Editor. She also is the host of the NASA Lunar Science Institute podcast and works with Astronomy Cast. Nancy is also a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador.

Aqua4U March 15, 2013 at 9:24 PM

Got zipped twice, so far. Now where did I put that can of “Cloud Away”?

Jason Hill March 16, 2013 at 12:06 AM

Oh, thanks for putting my photo up on your site. It wasn’t so easy to take. It was the result of six days of missed chances. Day six was the winner. That comet is practically invisible until about 55 minutes after sunset. Then it’s like a little smudge. Camera brings out the tail nicely, however. If you haven’t caught this one yet, don’t give up! It’s there.

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