Categories: Astrophotos

ISS and Cassiopeia by Adrian New

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On the morning of September 21, 2011, the International Space Station made a beautiful pass over San Antonio, Texas through the constellation of Cassiopeia. The pass was caught by Adrian New using his Nikon D200 camera and 18-70mm lens. The camera was set at ISO 200 and 30 second exposure.

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dianne

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