Shannon Hall

About Shannon Hall

Shannon Hall is an aspiring science journalist and is an editorial intern at Sky & Telescope magazine. She holds two B.A.'s from Whitman College in physics-astronomy and philosophy, and an M.S. in astronomy from the University of Wyoming. This fall she will attend NYU's Science, Health and Environmental Reporting program.

Here are my most recent posts

Early Tidal and Rotational Forces Helped Shape Moon

by Shannon Hall July 30, 2014

Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter The shape of the moon deviates from a simple sphere in a way that scientists have struggled to explain. But new research shows that tidal forces during the moon’s early history can explain most of its large-scale topography. As the moon […]

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Mysterious Molecules in Space Named?

by Shannon Hall July 30, 2014

It’s a well-kept secret that the vacuum of space is not — technically speaking — a vacuum. Strong winds generated from supernova explosions push material into the interstellar medium, tainting space with the heavier elements generated by nuclear fusion. These lonely molecules account for a significant amount of all the hydrogen, carbon, silicon, and other […]

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ALMA Observes Binary Star System with Wacky Disks

by Shannon Hall July 30, 2014

When it comes to exoplanets, we’ve discovered an array of extremes — alien worlds that seem more like science fiction than reality. But there are few environments more extreme than a binary star system in which planet formation can occur. Powerful gravitational perturbations from the two stars can easily grind a planet to dust, let […]

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GAIA is “Go” for Science After a few Minor Hiccups

by Shannon Hall July 29, 2014

In astronomy we throw around the term “light-year” seemingly as fast as light itself travels. And yet actually measuring this distance is incredibly tricky. A star’s parallax — its tiny apparent shift once a year caused by our moving viewpoint on Earth — tells its distance more truly than any other method. Accurate parallaxes of […]

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X-ray Glow: Evidence of a Local Hot Bubble Carved by a Supernova

by Shannon Hall July 29, 2014

I spent this past weekend backpacking in Rocky Mountain National Park, where although the snow-swept peaks and the dangerously close wildlife were staggering, the night sky stood in triumph. Without a fire, the stars, a few planets, and the surprisingly bright Milky Way provided the only light to guide our way. But the night sky […]

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