The crew of Challenger, lost on January 28, 1986. Credit: NASA.

Remembering Ron McNair and the Challenger Crew

Article Updated: 23 Dec , 2015

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Today is the 27th anniversary of the space shuttle Challenger disaster. On January 28, 1986, mission STS-51-L ended in tragedy when a O-ring failure in one of the solid rocket boosters allowed hot combustion gases to leak from the side of the booster and burn through the external fuel tank, causing an explosion exploded 73 seconds after takeoff, killing the crew and destroying the shuttle.

On board was a crew of seven. Here, we remember especially physicist Ronald E. McNair, who was the second African American to fly to space. This video is part of StoryCorps, a national oral history project, that you can hear on NPR (National Public Radio) in the US. StoryCorps records the stories of people — usually everyday people — and archive them at the Library of Congress. But this story is about someone famous; someone who kept his eyes on the stars and dreamed big dreams. McNair also few on the STS-41-B mission in 1984. Ron McNair’s brother, Carl, tells the story of how Ron was a kid with big dreams in Lake City, South Carolina.

Please take a few moments to remember the crew that lost their lives on that day:

– Francis R. Scobee – Mission Commander
– Michael J. Smith – Pilot
– Gregory B. Jarvis – Payload Specialist 1
– Christa McAuliffe – Payload Specialist 2
– Judith A. Resnik – Mission Specialist 1
– Ellison S. Onizuka – Mission Specialist 2
– Ronald E. McNair – Mission Specialist 3

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Lorin Ionita
Guest
Lorin Ionita
January 29, 2013 7:37 AM

Hats off to the police officers. So sad that a dream ended with a disaster, but kudos to him for realizing his dream.

delphinus100
Guest
delphinus100
January 30, 2013 1:03 AM

Hear, hear.

David Mead
Guest
January 29, 2013 2:03 PM

Beautiful, the McNair scholarship program has helped so many students realize their dreams.

Woodrow Wotan
Guest
January 29, 2013 11:29 PM

DARN YOU, U.T. Didn’t wanna cry today.

Aqua4U
Member
January 30, 2013 1:03 AM

AM STILL ticked off at the final decision to launch that shuttle! The solid rocket engineers said NOT to launch because of the extremely cold weather! But instead were ‘over ridden’ by top officials at the Regan White House and NASA! After all.. that shuttle had to go up! It WAS in his planned State of the Union Address that night! Hubris or simple disgrace? ACK! Shhhhh… not polite to remind… and no body wants to remember?

Peter
Member
Peter
January 30, 2013 2:10 AM

Great little story, yeah, I was worried too that the police would follow suit. May Ron always be remembered.

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