P46256

Asteroids

Two Asteroids Will Buzz Past Earth on December 11

11 Dec , 2012 by

Four computer generated views of Asteroid Toutatis based on Goldstone radar imagery. Via NASA

A newly discovered small asteroid named 2012 XE54 and a long-studied giant space rock named Toutatis will buzz past Earth during the next 24 hours, and astronomers are already watching the skies. While there is no danger of either hitting Earth, scientists have much to learn from both. Asteroid 2012 XE54 was discovered over the weekend on December 9 and it will safely pass between the Earth and the Moon’s orbit at a distance of about 226,000 km (141,000 miles) or about .6 lunar distances. Closest approach will be just a few hours after this article was posted, at 10:10 UTC on Dec. 11. But already an interesting event has already happened with this 28-meter-wide asteroid: it was eclipsed by Earth’s shadow. This is quite a rare event, and was visible to astronomers.

This animation shows the Sun and the Earth as observed from the asteroid 2012 XE54. If this eclipse occurs, the asteroid will be in Earth’s shadow. Animation via Pasquale Tricarico

Pasquale Tricarico of the Planetary Science Institute had predicted that the asteroid would pass through the Earth’s shadow, creating an asteroid eclipse, an event that is similar to an eclipse of the full Moon by Earth’s shadow. At 01:22 UTC on December 11 the eclipse began, and it left Earth’s shadow at 02:00 UTC. Those watching the asteroid noted that the asteroid “disappeared” from its track, and then reappeared after leaving Earth’s shadow.

“In two images taken at 01:30:16 and 01:31:18, 60sec exposure, 2012 XE54 appeared as a very faint and long track, then… nothing. In the following images there is no visible track. Wonderful!” wrote Elia Cozzi from the New Millennium Observatory, posting in the mpml asteroid research group message board.

We hope to have images of the event when they become available.

4179 Toutatis, with a shape that has been described as a “malformed potato” will pass at a large distance of 6.9 million kilometers (4.3 million miles) away from Earth, or more than 18 times the distance from the Earth to the Moon.

It is a biggie, though at 4.46 kilometers (2.7 miles) long and 2.4 kilometers (1.5 miles) wide, and is considered a potentially hazardous asteroid because it makes repeated passes by the Earth, about every four years. In comparison, the asteroid that is thought to have destroyed the dinosaurs was approximately 10 km (6 miles) wide.

It’s closest pass will be covered by the Slooh Space Camera on Tuesday, December 11th, with several live shows on Slooh.com, free to the public, starting at 20:00 UTC (12 PM PST / 3 PM EST, find international times here — accompanied by real-time discussions with Slooh President, Patrick Paolucci, and Astronomy Magazine columnist, Bob Berman.

At its maximum brightness, Toutatis might be barely visible through binoculars, but should be very bright through Slooh telescopes at its being tracked.

“We will be tracking Asteroid Toutatis live from two observatory locations – Canary Islands, off the coast of Africa and Arizona,” said Patrick Paolucci, President at Slooh.

Astronomers are interested in this returning asteroid to try and figure out what the asteroid is made of. Also by refining a model of the asteroid’s rotation, they’ll get a better idea of its composition, thereby gaining a greater understanding of the early solar system.

Lance Benner from JPL said that this asteroid is tumbling slowly, but with a complex motion.

“It’s a very peculiar rotation state,” Benner said. “It rotates very slowly and it tumbles in a manner somewhat similar to the way a football tumbles if you screw up a long pass.”

Sources: Slooh, Earth-Sky blog, JPL Small Body database, Planetary Science Institute

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By  -        
Nancy Atkinson is currently Universe Today's Contributing Editor. Previously she served as UT's Senior Editor and lead writer, and has worked with Astronomy Cast and 365 Days of Astronomy. Nancy is also a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador.



Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
John Stock
Guest
December 11, 2012 3:44 AM

would have been handy to tell us this a a few day before.

Equalthruliberty
Guest
Equalthruliberty
December 11, 2012 12:55 PM

There is a nice table of P.H.A.’s @ spaceweather dot com. Just a friendly F.Y.I.

John Stock
Guest
December 12, 2012 9:49 AM

thanks.

Gregor Shapiro
Guest
December 11, 2012 4:41 AM

“…the asteroid that is thought to have destroyed the dinosaurs…”
How about
“…the asteroid that is thought to have changed the Earth’s environment so rapidly that most of the dinosaurs became extinct…”

Dampe
Guest
Dampe
December 11, 2012 6:16 AM

Wow! :S You corrected something so insignificant.
You just turned an easy, simple to understand sentence into a mouthful of necessary literal information.

Ryan Moore
Guest
Ryan Moore
December 11, 2012 10:50 AM

No, he did not. I personally was always under the impression that an asteriod large enough hit the earth so hard all the dinosaurs died from the shock.

Bobr
Member
Bobr
December 11, 2012 5:20 PM

Wow!
Flaming someone for being specific and accurate at a science blog!

Zachary Gross
Guest
Zachary Gross
December 11, 2012 5:42 PM

Yes, it is more correct. But this article is not about how the dinosaurs went extinct. The “correction” is irrelevant.

Bobr
Member
Bobr
December 11, 2012 7:21 PM

I disagree.
If it’s in the article, it’s relevant.

This site shouldn’t be one strictly for information; it is also be for education.
Not every subscriber has the education level or opportunities as you or I might have.

In my opinion, I don’t think that Greg Shapiro was nit-picking on this particular point.
When I first read the sentence, it was glaringly ambiguous to me, too.
The author adding even one word like “ultimately” would have made it concise.

Paul M Evora
Guest
Paul M Evora
December 11, 2012 5:09 AM

This small asteroid was discovered only like 2 days ago. Lucky us, it would not hit earth. But what if it was to hit earth, what could we do in just 2 days notice? Scary thing:- /

Joe McFarland
Guest
December 11, 2012 10:07 AM

Thats not true, you clearly didn’t even read the article. This is a well known asteroid and it passes every four years… They have most asteroids’ paths projected already using computer models, and although anything can happen, if we are in line to get hit, you’ll know about it long before then.

Alison
Guest
Alison
December 11, 2012 6:54 AM

or, a little earlier in the article, as Paul correctly paraphrased “Asteroid 2012 XE54 was discovered over the weekend on December 9 and it will safely pass between the Earth and the Moon’s orbit at a distance of about 226,000 km (141,000 miles) or about .6 lunar distances.” – this thing, while only 28m wide (still a pretty huge chunk of rock if it lands on your house though – how much of it would burn up on entry?), passed half way between the moon and us and was completely unknown before Sunday. I reckon Paul poses a fair question.

Rui Sousa
Guest
December 11, 2012 12:53 PM

Paul meant the newly discovered 2012 XE54 asteroid, not Toutatis. Please follow your own advice.

Luvz2spooge
Guest
Luvz2spooge
December 11, 2012 1:43 PM

I don’t think they would say a god damn word about it tbh. Why create a panic? Maybe word would trickle down but nothing official. Not unless one of us discovers it.

Alan J
Guest
Alan J
December 13, 2012 5:16 AM

Exactly! We have an asteroid nearly 1/2 the size of the one that killed the dinosaurs every 4 years and we’re just watching?

Joe McFarland
Guest
December 11, 2012 10:08 AM

“Astronomers are interested in this returning asteroid to try and figure out what the asteroid is made of. Also by refining a model of the asteroid’s rotation, they’ll get a better idea of its composition, thereby gaining a greater understanding of the early solar system.” Right there near the bottom son. Read before you speak.

Lorin Ionita
Guest
Lorin Ionita
December 12, 2012 7:38 AM

“A newly discovered small asteroid named 2012 XE54 and a long-studied giant space rock named Toutatis”

Olaf
Member
Olaf
December 11, 2012 12:52 PM

The small one is only 28 meters wide.

It is only annoying if you happen to stand below it where it impacts but not a world scale event.

Here you can play with the parameters.
http://www.purdue.edu/impactearth/

TheVeganarchist
Guest
December 11, 2012 7:09 AM

those things in the picture look more like “ass-droids” if you catch my drift

Rick Holcomb
Guest
December 11, 2012 1:43 PM

I guess we shouldn’t keep 12 year olds off this site, even if we could. They *might* learn something.

brijesh gupta
Guest
brijesh gupta
December 11, 2012 4:47 AM

what u say about 21 dec 2012 …….some body says it is end of earth

Kevin Frushour
Guest
December 11, 2012 10:46 AM

Are we still here?

Josh eashappie
Guest
Josh eashappie
December 12, 2012 7:21 AM

while yes we are, its not prodicted how fast it could come at the earth, or even sure if the days are correct as we can only assume

Midwestmutt
Guest
Midwestmutt
December 11, 2012 11:26 AM

Only an astronomer could get excited about not seeing something.

e420Kush
Guest
December 13, 2012 9:46 PM

“But already an interesting event has already happened with this
28-meter-wide asteroid: it was eclipsed by Earth’s shadow. This is
quite a rare event, and was visible to astronomers.”

Says here they could see it, what are you talking about….?

JoTimmJo
Guest
JoTimmJo
December 11, 2012 1:01 PM

Sometimes man you jsut gotta roll with it.

http://www.Got-Anonz.tk

Olaf
Member
Olaf
December 11, 2012 8:39 PM

It is the extinction of doom promoters.

Lorin Ionita
Guest
Lorin Ionita
December 12, 2012 7:40 AM

Sadly… no. It’s not the first time the apocalypse has been predicted. As always a new date will be picked and everything will go full circle again.

Paul Felix Schott
Guest
Paul Felix Schott
December 12, 2012 1:34 AM
ALL THAT EVER LIVED ON EARTH WILL SOON HAVE THEIR EYES TO THE HEAVENS Do a little History on this one. ALL Should Look Up “2012 DA14”. This could take out one of more satellites and the junk and debris from the hit could end up taking out many more satellites very soon after that. All the satellite collision probability will go way up if even one is hit. The velocity that the parts would go to would make them missiles that would start targeting a chain reaction this would not be good. Most all will be watching this one and pray it goes by us with out a hit. Every Scientist alive will be watching this event.… Read more »
Phil Marinus
Guest
December 12, 2012 1:57 AM

I must get some of those Drugs your on.

Dampe
Guest
Dampe
December 12, 2012 9:17 AM

And you check out Matthew 21:17.
Think about it…

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