Watch the James Webb Telescope Being Built Via “Webb-cam”

by Nancy Atkinson on July 3, 2012

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Want to watch the highly anticipated James Webb Space Telescope come together? NASA has set up a webcam – in this case a “Webb-cam” — for anyone to track the progress JWST inside a clean room at Goddard Space Flight Center. Recently, the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) was delivered and it will be integrated into the science instrument payload. Two cameras show the action, although the cameras will show just screen shots that are updated once every minute.

When is the best time to watch? The clean room is generally occupied Monday through Friday from 5 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. PDT (8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. EDT).

Click the image above for access to the Webb-cams, or visit the Webb-cam website.

Of the James Webb Space Telescope’s four science instruments, only MIRI can see light in the mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. This unique capability will allow the Webb telescope to study physical processes occurring in the cosmos that the other Webb instruments cannot see.

MIRI’s sensitive detectors will allow it to make unique observations of many things, including the light of distant galaxies, newly forming stars within our own Milky Way, and the formation of planets around stars other than our own, as well as planets, comets and the outermost debris disk in our own solar system.

About 

Nancy Atkinson is Universe Today's Senior Editor. She also works with Astronomy Cast, and is a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador.

Steve- Construction Contractor July 3, 2012 at 6:11 PM

Awesome. If only I can get Windows 7 to set this as an Active Desktop so that I can keep it streaming on my desktop without a window open.

Thanks for the source and time.

Nothing like watching other people work when I want to take a break.

briansheen July 4, 2012 at 2:37 PM

MIRI is an ESA instrument, some of my friends assembled it in the world famous Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. It is so senstive that it could detect “a candle on one of Jupiter’s moons”.

Roseland Observatory UK

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