How Plasma Technology From Space Will Save Our Lives

by Jason Major on May 23, 2012

ISS research finds plasma has killing power against some of the nastiest of critters

It might sound obvious to anyone who’s ever played a video game in the past thirty years, but plasma has been found to be very effective at destroying some truly dangerous beasts. Except in this case, the battlefields aren’t space bases, they’re hospitals… and the creatures aren’t CGI alien monsters, they’re very real — and very dangerous — bacteria right here on Earth.

Scarier than any alien: 20,000x magnification of drug-resistant staphylococcus aureus bacteria (CDC)

Long-running experiments performed aboard the International Space Station have been instrumental in the development of plasma-based tools that can be used to kill bacteria in hospitals — especially potentially deadly strains of Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, also known as MRSA.

MRSA infections can occur in people who have undergone surgery or other invasive hospital procedures, or have weakened immune systems and are exposed to the bacteria in a hospital or other health care environment. A form of staph that’s become resistant to many antibiotics, MRSA is notoriously difficult to treat, easily transmitted — both in and out of hospitals — and deadly.

Various strains of MRSA infections have been found to be linked to mortality rates ranging from 10% to 50%.

Dr. Gregor Morfill, director of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, has been researching the antimicrobial abilities of plasma in experiments running aboard the ISS since 2001. What he and his team have found is that cold plasma can effectively sanitize skin and surfaces, getting into cracks and crevices that soap and even UV light cannot. Even though bacteria like staphylococcus are constantly evolving resistances to medications, they wither under a barrage of plasma.

Eventually, Dr. Morfill’s research, funded by ESA, helped with the creation of a working prototype that could be used in hospitals — literally a plasma weapon for fighting microbes.

It's no BFG, but it can kill flesh-eating monsters in mass quantities (Photo: Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics)

This is yet another example of “trickle-down” technology developed in space. Over two dozen astronauts and cosmonauts have worked on the research aboard the ISS over the past decade, and one day you may have cold plasma disinfecting devices in your home, cleaning your toothbrushes and countertops.

In addition the technology could be used to clean exploration spacecraft, preventing contamination of other worlds with Earthly organisms.

“It has many practical applications, from hand hygiene to food hygiene, disinfection of medical instruments, personal hygiene, even dentistry,” said Dr. Morfill. “This could be used in many, many fields.”

Bacteria, prepare to get fragged.

News source: ScienceDaily. Top Doom3 image from http://www.moddb.com/.

Yum! Dirty fingers! (MPE)

About 

A graphic designer in Rhode Island, Jason writes about space exploration on his blog Lights In The Dark, Discovery News, and, of course, here on Universe Today. Ad astra!

Comments on this entry are closed.

Previous post:

Next post: