Viewing Alert: New Interview Series with Neil Armstrong

by Nancy Atkinson on May 1, 2012

Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter

Apollo 11 landing site. Credit: NASA

There’s a new four-part interview series with Apollo astronaut Neil Armstrong, and part 1 is now available for viewing. The first man to walk on the Moon gives a personal commentary on Apollo 11’s historic lunar landing, his thoughts on leadership and taking risks to innovate for the future. With the future of NASA’s program currently under scrutiny, throughout the series Armstrong will talk about his position on the policy direction of the space agency, speaks candidly on his early life, and even tackles conspiracy theorist claims that the Moon landing never happened – using images from Google Moon to demonstrate their path. The series also includes previously unseen footage of the lunar descent. Armstrong doesn’t give many interviews, and the show’s producers say this is the first on-camera interview Armstrong has done since 2005. The episodes are from evoTV’s series, The Bottom Line.

The different parts will be released over the next few weeks:

Part 1 – Space Race: now available

Part 2 – Blast Off available 8 May

Part 3 – Giant Leap available 15 May

Part 4 – Presidential Pride available 22 May

About 

Nancy Atkinson is Universe Today's Senior Editor. She also works with Astronomy Cast, and is a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador.

Gozlemci May 1, 2012 at 5:26 PM

Thanks for this presentation…

morphics May 2, 2012 at 12:46 AM

Wonderful, thanks Nancy. That was a great watch, looking forward to the next episodes. Armstrong is very lucid as he talks about his life, and I note that he still carries a pen in his top pocket!

Jose_Rafael May 2, 2012 at 7:30 PM

Thanks so much for presenting this series. I know Mr Armstrong doesn’t give too many of these. Not to diminish his historic contribution to American space exploration – I just often wonder if it isn’t a bit unfair for us to always focus on the distinction of “first man” as opposed to say “member of the first landing crew.” After all, Apollo 11 was a three-man mission, and the breath-taking task getting the LEM onto the lunar surface was a two-man operation. Buzz was right behind him.

Looking forward to parts 2 – 4.

Nelson Bridwell May 9, 2012 at 5:21 AM

NASA could not have chosen a better man!

Comments on this entry are closed.

Previous post:

Next post: