SpaceX Launch to Space Station Delayed

by Nancy Atkinson on April 23, 2012

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In a processing hangar at Space Launch Complex-40 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, Space Exploration Technologies technicians close the hatch of the Dragon capsule. Credit: NASA

The historic flight of the first commercial transport to the International Space Station will have to wait at least another week. “After reviewing our recent progress, it was clear that we needed more time to finish hardware-in-the-loop testing and properly review and follow up on all data,” SpaceX said in a statement today. “While it is still possible that we could launch on May 3rd, it would be wise to add a few more days of margin in case things take longer than expected. As a result, our launch is likely to be pushed back by one week, pending coordination with NASA.”

And so, the launch which was going to take place on April 30 is now pushed back to no earlier than May 7. A static fire test of the Falcon 9 rocket that SpaceX had hoped to do today was slipped to the 27th, making the all the preparations for the launch next Monday a tight squeeze.

When launched, the Dragon will arrive at the ISS one to three days later and once there, Dragon will begin the demonstrations related to the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services Phase 2 agreements (COTS 2) to show proper performance and control in the vicinity of the ISS, while remaining outside the Station’s safe zone. Then, if all goes well, Dragon will receive approval to begin the COTS 3 activities, where it will gradually approach within a few meters of the ISS, allowing astronauts to reach out and grapple Dragon with the Station’s robotic arm and then maneuver it carefully into one of the docking ports.

About 

Nancy Atkinson is Universe Today's Senior Editor. She also is the host of the NASA Lunar Science Institute podcast and works with Astronomy Cast. Nancy is also a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador.

TheDirtBoy April 24, 2012 at 1:13 AM

Your an idiot! We’re talking about haman lives and billions in government proprety. They are being careful and methodical with so much at stake, there is ZERO room for error. They are doing precisely what they should to ensure nothing goes wrong and everyone gets to go home to their families afterwards.

Frank van Drogen April 24, 2012 at 8:30 AM

Of course, ‘first commercial transport’, should be read as ‘first American commercial transport’. Ariane Space is a commercial launch service.

Aaron Glafenhein April 24, 2012 at 5:14 PM

There are a large number of commercial space transport services that have been operation for decades through out the world. i think what is implied here is that this will the first Commercial space transport designed to transport people.

Aqua4U April 24, 2012 at 6:36 PM

Hard to agree or disagree on how to define commercial? “A commercial government?” is that like saying the Republican Party is the Church of Capitalism? Then I found religion…?

gopher652003 April 25, 2012 at 1:38 AM

It most certainly isn’t the “first commercial launch” (that was decades ago). It is, however, the first commercial [cargo] launch to the ISS, as stated in the article.

Aqua4U April 24, 2012 at 6:27 PM

Yass… please test the Falcon-9′s nine engines one more time! That ‘Final-Final’ test is always the best! Time to go! GO Space-X!

Aqua4U April 24, 2012 at 6:39 PM

I forget.. was Ariane Space partially subsidized by the Gov’ts of France and E-land? and?

Shawn Schuiteboer April 25, 2012 at 9:29 PM

If this is Elon’s will, then let it be so.

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