Moscow At Night

by Jason Major on April 10, 2012

Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter

Photo by Expedition 30 crew during a night pass over Moscow on March 28, 2012.

Tracing a bright star upon the Earth, the lights of Russia’s capital city blaze beyond the solar panels of the International Space Station in this photo, captured by the Expedition 30 crew on the night of March 28, 2012.

As an electric-blue dawn flares around Earth’s northeastern limb, the green and purple fire of the Aurora Borealis shimmers and stretches away to the northwest above a pale yellow line of airglow.

Traveling at 17,500 miles an hour (28,163 km/hr), the ISS was approximately 240 miles (386 km) above the Russian city of Volgograd (formerly Stalingrad) when this photo was taken.

Image: NASA

About 

A graphic designer in Rhode Island, Jason writes about space exploration on his blog Lights In The Dark, Discovery News, and, of course, here on Universe Today. Ad astra!

Prism2Spectrum April 11, 2012 at 2:25 PM

That photo widened my eyes, and lowered my jaw: Artfully spectacular! Wow! Love the color-mix of celestial-world canvas. The angle of Technology above, and the starburst of Civilization below, is truly awesome–in reflections of widefield-frames. A World of teeming with Life; an Thought of outward-reaching Intelligence, and its Ascent of of triumphal Dream:

O, Leonardo Da Vinci, from visions of flight, premature: if under the stars awakened, what you could now see!

“For once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth
with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been
and there you will long to return.”

— Leonardo da Vinci ( a man who dreamed )

Comments on this entry are closed.

Previous post:

Next post: