Moons Large and Small

by Jason Major on February 29, 2012

Titan and Prometheus are dwarfed by giant Saturn (NASA/JPL/SSI)

It may be one of the best images from Cassini yet this year! Cloud-covered Titan and tiny Prometheus (can you see it just above the rings on the right?) are literally dwarfed by their parent Saturn in an image captured on Jan. 5, 2012.

Prometheus’ pinpoint shadow can also be seen on Saturn’s cloud tops, just inside the thin, outermost F ring shadow at bottom left.

The two moons themselves couldn’t be more different; Titan, 3,200 miles (5,150 km) wide, is wrapped in a nitrogen and methane atmosphere ten times thicker than Earth’s and is covered with vast plains of dark hydrocarbon dunes and crisscrossed by rivers of liquid methane.

Prometheus imaged by Cassini in Dec. 2009.

Prometheus, on the other hand, is a potato-shaped shepherd moon 92 miles long and 53 miles wide (148 x 53 km) that orbits Saturn just inside the narrow, ropy F ring. While it doesn’t have an atmosphere, it does create some impressive effects on the icy material in the ring!

Another moon, Pandora, casts its shadow onto Saturn just outside the F ring shadow at bottom center. 50 miles (80 km) wide, Pandora shepherds the outer edge of the F ring but is itself not visible in this image. Watch an animation here.

This image was featured on the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS) website on Feb. 28, 2012. The view looks toward the southern, unilluminated side of the rings from about 1 degree below the ringplane.

Image credit: NASA / JPL / Space Science Institute.

About 

A graphic designer in Rhode Island, Jason writes about space exploration on his blog Lights In The Dark, Discovery News, and, of course, here on Universe Today. Ad astra!

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