Suitable For Framing: Latest Eye Candy from Cassini

by Nancy Atkinson on October 10, 2011

Enceladus and Tethys hang below Saturn's rings in this new image from the Cassini spacecraft. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SS

Another Cassini stunner! This gorgeous, suitable-for-framing image shows two of Saturn’s moons hanging below the planet’s rings, as if strung on a necklace. Beautiful! Enceladus (504 kilometers, 313 miles across) appears just below the rings, while Tethys (1062 kilometers, 660 miles across) appears below. In this shot, Cassini is also closer to Tethys than Enceladus: the spacecraft is 208,000 kilometers (139,000 miles) from Tethys and 272,000 kilometers (169,000 miles) from Enceladus. This image was taken on September 13, 2011.

See below for some raw images from Cassini’s October 1 close fly by of Enceladus, including a great shot of the moon hovering in front of Saturn’s rings, and a view of the geysers.


A closeup view of Enceladus with Saturn's rings in the background. This raw image was taken on Oct. 1, 2011. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

A view of Enceladus from farther away, with the rings slicing through the view of Saturn in the background. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

A view of the geysers on Enceladus, from Cassini's latest close flyby of the moon, on October 1, 2011.Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

About 

Nancy Atkinson is Universe Today's Senior Editor. She also works with Astronomy Cast, and is a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador.

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