STEREO Spacecraft Provides First Complete Image of Sun’s Far Side

by Nancy Atkinson on June 14, 2011

First complete image of the far side of the sun taken on June 1, 2011. Click image for larger version. Credit: NASA/STEREO.

Far out! This is the first complete image of the solar far side, the half of the sun invisible from Earth. Captured on June 1, 2011, the composite image was assembled from NASA’s two Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. STEREO-Ahead’s data is shown on the left half of image and STEREO-Behind’s data on the right.

You may recall that the two STEREO spacecraft reached opposition (180 degree separation) on February 6 of this year and the science team released a “complete” 360 degree view of the Sun. However, a small part of the sun was inaccessible to their combined view until June 1. This image represents the first day when the entire far side could be seen.

The image is aligned so that solar north is directly up. The seam between the two images is inclined because the plane of Earth’s – and STEREO’s – orbit, known as the “ecliptic”, is inclined with respect to the sun’s axis of rotation. The data was collected by STEREO’s Extreme Ultraviolet Imagers in the SECCHI instrument suites.

The video below explains why seeing the entire Sun is helpful to scientists:

Source: PhysOrg

About 

Nancy Atkinson is Universe Today's Senior Editor. She also works with Astronomy Cast, and is a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador.

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