end-of-the-world-may-12-2011

World Ending on May 21? Don’t Count on It

Article Updated: 24 Dec , 2015

by

Why do some humans have a fixation on the world coming to an end? From ancient Nostradamus to Marshall Applewhite of Heaven’s Gate fame, there have been a myriad of ultimately failed predictions that the world will meet its demise. The latest prediction comes from Harold Camping, a preacher from California who says the Second Coming of Jesus will occur conveniently at 6 pm local time for each time zone around the world coming up this weekend, on May 21, 2011.

While he claims to have used math to predict this event, perhaps a better use of math would be to count how many times soothsayers and doomsday con artists have incorrectly predicted the end of the world in the past. So far they have all been 100% wrong. Camping himself is guilty of incorrectly predicting the end of the world back in 1994, so his track record is not very good either. So if you’re wondering – mathematically speaking — based on the number of past predictions of the end of the world being right, and the number of past predictions of Camping about the end of the world being right, the odds of Camping being wrong this time are 100%.

So sleep well, and enjoy your weekend!

Need some proof? Here’s a look at some past failed predictions, as well as an infographic from LiveScience.com about the many predictions of doom. Humans seem to like doomsday predictions so much that we even like to make movies about it.

And by the way, the end of the world predictions being pure nonsense goes for the 2012 prognostications, as well. You can read our series about why they are all wrong here.

Interestingly, many past predictions of the end of the world coincide with religious fanaticism (from the top image, above, it appears Camping’s prediction has the biblical seal of approval…) and/or trying to make money. (Camping has amassed $120 million in donations from fervent followers). One of the most recent was God’s Church minister Ronald Weinland who pitched his book “2008: God’s Final Witness” by predicting the world would end by 2008, with the “end times” beginning in 2006.

Before that, it was the Heaven’s Gate mess, where Applewhite’s followers actually did kill themselves so that they would be taken by an alien spacecraft coming along with comet Hale-Bopp in 1997, (I guess, unfortunately the world did end for them…). This prediction included accusations of a huge cover-up by NASA who supposedly knew the alien craft was hidden in the comet’s coma.

Televangelist Pat Robertson predicted Judgment Day would come in 1982. Scarily, Robertson later ran for president of the United States.

Joseph Smith, founder of the Mormon church predicted the world would end by 1891, and a group that would eventually become the Seventh-Day Adventists predicted the end by 1843.

Some bad-science related predictions include the Y2K scare (which didn’t even burn out a light bulb), several “planetary alignment” predictions that would throw the Earth into tumult (including one in 2000 by Richard Noone), the return of Halley’s Comet in 1910 would envelope Earth in deadly toxic gases, and of course, all the 2012 predictions, which are based on very inaccurate science and the downright mean and nasty tactic of trying to scare people.

Nostradumus, a.k.a. Michel de Nostrdame has been one of the longest-running predictors of doom and gloom, and his vague, metaphorical writings have intrigued people for over 400 years. The vagueness allows for very flexible interpretations, allowing some people to claim that a number of Nostradamus’ predictions have come true. One prediction he gave included a year: “The year 1999, seventh month / From the sky will come great king of terror.”

I’m pretty sure that didn’t happen, just like all the other predictions. The ones listed here are just a sampling of the incorrect predictions throughout time.

 A brief history of doomsdays
Source:LiveScience

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J. Major
Guest
May 17, 2011 6:31 PM

Although Armageddon was such a bad movie, it may have ended the world of cinema as we know it…

Roman Sill
Guest
May 17, 2011 6:39 PM

Ha ha ha. Morons. Ha ha ha.

Frank West
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Frank West
May 18, 2011 2:34 PM

Scoffer’s motto

ALL IS WELL WITH THE WORLD

Anonymous
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Anonymous
May 18, 2011 5:59 PM
I take it you are a believer in the end days? I am considering repenting my wayward sinful ways. However, I am a bit like doubting Thomas. I’m not sure I am convinced. I need a gesture of good faith. Before you offer up words of wisdom, I know of an action that would speak to me louder than any words could possibly achieve. Roman, if you truly believe that your last Day on Earth will be May 21st, you obviously don’t need any more money then what will get you through three next three days. If you would transfer your wealth to me, I would understand that you are serious. Such a selfless act of trust in… Read more »
Jeffrey Longton
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May 17, 2011 6:47 PM

well lets wait and see won’t we..

jo
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jo
May 18, 2011 12:10 PM

What a waist of money. If these believers were really Christ Like, they would have used this money to help the poor and sick. The earth will go on for many millions of years. Man, at some point will become extinct as do all species. We are no different when it comes to extinction. Are only difference is are individual and mass human ego, which is always wrong. Sheeple-people=SAD!

Michael
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Michael
May 18, 2011 2:31 PM

“I like your Christ. I do not like your Christians, they are so much unlike your Christ…” – Ghandi

William928
Member
William928
May 18, 2011 11:27 PM

Perhaps you should use these last days to return to school and finish your obviously lacking education. “waist of money?” Please…..

RobbT
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RobbT
May 17, 2011 6:51 PM

You’ve just got to love Google ads and it’s (mis)targeted advertising. At the top of this article are: “Ask a psychic a free question”, http://www.worldtocome.org (read the bible about 2012), http://www.theRCG.org (the “truth” about 2012), http://www.stealthstockonline.com (coming 2011 market collapse), and http://www.ChrstianPrayerCenter.com.

I’m willing to give people 5 cents on the dollar for their cars and their houses, as long as we can complete it before Saturday.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous
May 17, 2011 6:59 PM

What I want to know is, who paid for the 5 (yes count ’em, 5) identical RV’s wrapped with the graphics from this Judgement day logo that showed up all the way on the other coast at the Rhode Island state house? I was floored.

Lawrence B. Crowell
Member
Lawrence B. Crowell
May 17, 2011 7:15 PM
There are a number of doomsday ideas. One of them is certain. The universe in 10^{100} years will evolve into a de Sitter vacuum state, where upon after a far longer time period it will quantum decay into a complete void. Homo sapiens will not survive through that — guaranteed. I also don’t think there are escape hatches to other cosmologies. So the long term situation is one of doom. Much sooner than this we will most likely not exist a billion years into the future. A million years looks pretty bad as well. So hurray we are doomed! The average hominid species only existed a few hundred thousand years, and we are probably no exception. Accepting this… Read more »
Dark Gnat
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Dark Gnat
May 17, 2011 7:55 PM
LC, you are correct, sir. The Apostle John was banished to Patmos island during his authorship of Revelations. There are three explanations for is visions: 1. He really was seeing the future or coming to conclusions after long thought. 2. He went crazy. 3. Hw had much more mundane ideas or statments, but hid them in metaphors in case the authorities got ahold of his letters. (Apparently, fundamentalists have no idea what metaphors are.) As far as the movies mentioned in the article, I say Terminator (minus time travel) is a good possibility. AI controlled war machines already exist, and a few have glitched and killed people. For a very realistic scenario (one that I think is darn-near… Read more »
Lawrence B. Crowell
Member
Lawrence B. Crowell
May 17, 2011 9:17 PM
Without Revelations the Bible or NT would end with Jude, which is an inauspicious end to the whole thing. So Revelations was brought into the compilation because it basically has the “camp of the saints” prevailing in the end with the coming of Jesus. The Book of Revelations, which frankly I have little understanding of and it makes little sense to me, does have a lot of code in it. There are disputes over what they mean. Some thought is the number 666 is meant to represent the Emperor Nero, but about the time John is presumed to have written Revelations Vespasian would have been Emperor, so that is a bit odd. The various beasts and whores are… Read more »
Anonymous
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Anonymous
May 18, 2011 12:31 AM

OMG, Mel Gibson is our lord and saviour?

Pvt.Pantzov
Member
May 18, 2011 10:30 AM

writing with “certainty” about the state of the universe in 10^100 years is my only gripe with the above post.

Pvt.Pantzov
Member
May 18, 2011 10:30 AM

writing with “certainty” about the state of the universe in 10^100 years is my only gripe with the above post.

Lawrence B. Crowell
Member
Lawrence B. Crowell
May 18, 2011 1:29 PM
Maybe the word certain is a bit strong. The accelerated expansion of the universe does though indicate the vacuum state of the universe is a de Sitter spacetime. The existence of mass-energy in the universe is a perturbation on that configuration. However, the exponential acceleration will diffuse that out enormously and the spacetime cosmology will asymptote to a de Sitter geometry. So this scenario has in my opinion a pretty high level of confidence. It would require something highly extraordinary to change this. That extraordinary event might be some catastrophic singularity event, maybe associated with Dp-brane oscillation/collisions. If so the same conclusion holds, we will not get out of it alive. LC
Anonymous
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Anonymous
May 18, 2011 6:54 PM
I still wouldn’t discount the possibility of a solution to the de Sitter vacuum state. There could be some exotic physics as yet unknown that would allow some form of escape route. History has proven that certainty is a shaky principal. Surely you recognize this. If the physics proves to be correct, and complete entropy is the ultimate fate of the universe, one could reasonably surmise that this is a problem some advanced form of intelligence/lifeform – past, present, or future – would tackle. Certainly the statistical odds are that lifeforms somewhere have survived and developed for milenia, even if they are rare. This might be one of the few things that we can assume some are/have/will contemplate.… Read more »
Lawrence B. Crowell
Member
Lawrence B. Crowell
May 18, 2011 8:00 PM
I think it was Gell-Mann who said that anything not forbidden by physics is mandatory. Physics can give contingencies for why something is forbidden, but not an absolute necessary and sufficient condition for something as forbidden. However, the problem with wormholing into another cosmology is that it is not that different from trying to escape a black hole. That is an extremely tough call. I think it is highly unlikely this can happen. Of course science is not about proving things. We can support a theory with data and evidence, but that never proves them as truth. So maybe we can tunnel into another universe. Maybe we can connect the interior of a black hole to the outside… Read more »
Potatoswatter
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May 18, 2011 10:10 PM
Right-wing conspiracy isn’t necessary. Attempts at greater economic efficiency through technology pose tougher technical problems to ill-equipped politicians. Better leaders being unable to look better than demagogues, they are pushed aside as society at large gives up on problem-solving in favor of emotional security. The latter part of the above reflects the rise of European dictators, but I don’t see the parallel between now and 100 years ago. 1914 was only the middle of the period of upheaval including (widespread) industrialization, the end of monarchy, and the introduction of truly universal education. On the scale of things, an actual holy war between Muslim-majority nations and American demagogues desperate for job creation could happen. But it would have few… Read more »
Lawrence B. Crowell
Member
Lawrence B. Crowell
May 19, 2011 1:02 AM
The similarity is not with the particular political situation which occurred. The upheaval prior to 1914-1945 occurred during 1788-1815. The political situations with those two were completely different. So this is not about some historicity about conditions that existed at the time. The similarity is with social behavior. There are these violent events which occur where whole societies go crazy. The causes for these and how they play out may be very different. There have been some small local events of this nature in very recent history, Rwanda, Congo, Yugoslavia, Cambodia and so forth. Each of these had very different political and other driving causes behind them. The big ones occur about every century. I figure the time… Read more »
Anonymous
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Anonymous
May 18, 2011 10:19 PM

True indeed. I realize our concerns should and must be more immediate.

I doubt the US economy will collapse in July. Obama’s opponents would be crazy to force the US government into financial catastrophe. Doubtless, they are leveraging their current political advantages to press a president who’s more comfortable in the campaign chair then as he is as a tough dealing leader. Every time this debt ceiling has been reached, it’s raised again anyway. Perhaps the Republicans have a point, here – though they are just as guilty as any recent democratic leadership.

Catastrophe, here we come.

Torbjorn Larsson OM
Member
Torbjorn Larsson OM
May 18, 2011 9:31 PM

Well, if eternal inflation exists the solution to your problem is simple enough; universes (re)produce indefinitely. You just need to get back up to an inflation state – “become one with the inflationary universe”.

Not a very biological solution though, should you manage to do it.

Anonymous
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Anonymous
May 18, 2011 10:10 PM

heh, sounds so simple.

I rather like our biological answer to genetic immortality, don’t you?

Pvt.Pantzov
Member
May 18, 2011 10:35 AM

with respect, “certain” and “condition of the universe in 10^100 years” do not belong together.

Emme Snnn
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Emme Snnn
May 17, 2011 7:35 PM

Harold Camping is not a Christian. He is an Angry Old MAN spending a million dollars to hate the Church and says the world is ending May 21.

HE WAS KICKED OUT OF CHURCH IN 1988 NO real Christian would listen to him, he is NOT of God

HE WILL NOT GIVE A PENNY BACK TO HIS FOLLOWERS ON THE 22ND

SEE HERE http://haroldcamping-21.blogspot.com/2011/05/harold-camping-no-money-refunds-on-22nd.html

Torbjorn Larsson OM
Member
Torbjorn Larsson OM
May 17, 2011 9:30 PM

Are we supposed to feel better about christianity, if it first inspires a person and on top of that there is no responsibility taken such as striking apocalyptic texts out of religious texts? He is still a christian preacher, just not of your (?) church.

Jon Voisey
Member
May 17, 2011 10:26 PM

No True Scottsman anyone?

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous
May 17, 2011 11:35 PM

How old do real Christians believe the Universe is? Do real Christians read Genesis literally or allegorically? How do outsiders decide who is and who is not a real Christian? Is this really an issue for an astronomy blog?

Ian Manson
Guest
May 17, 2011 9:12 PM

And if they do read it allegorically, how can they take some parts literally, and vice versa?
Did God get confused half way through his Word and forget whether he was using metaphors? And what does that mean for his omnipotence?

Ian Manson
Guest
May 17, 2011 9:12 PM

And if they do read it allegorically, how can they take some parts literally, and vice versa?
Did God get confused half way through his Word and forget whether he was using metaphors? And what does that mean for his omnipotence?

Potatoswatter
Guest
May 18, 2011 9:16 AM

It’s omnipotence, not omnicompetence.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous
May 18, 2011 12:22 PM

Omni/Multi dimensional, diverse, including nano phenomenon that we are not privy to at this stage of our advancement. hence allegorical, metaphorical, are all part of the dynamics…GO FIGURE

Lawrence B. Crowell
Member
Lawrence B. Crowell
May 18, 2011 12:26 PM
I think everyone should read the Bible, and fortunately I am rather familiar with it and have read it through a couple of times. My religious background is Judaism and Catholicism, so I know this from a couple of angles. The reason people should know the Bible is so these fundamentalist types can’t claim exclusive ownership of the bible. There is a little problem these people have. The problem is the story of the creation has Adam and Eve, or just adam = mankind (there are two interwoven creation stories), placed in a perfect newly created world, but where something still goes wrong. The serpent comes and tells Eve that eating the forbidden fruit will not kill her… Read more »
Kenneth Carrell
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Kenneth Carrell
May 18, 2011 2:18 PM
I think you are missing the point. I agree that the creation story is a metaphor, and therefore, trying to constrain it with current knowledge is meaningless because we don’t know the details of the similarities between the stories. When you were a child and asked what the twinkling things in the night sky were, I’m sure your parents didn’t go into the complexities of nuclear fusion, the p-p chain and CNO cycle, opacities all the way through the photosphere and then a discussion on E&M to explain the propagation of light. You were told in simple, easy to understand terms that sufficed for that time and place in your life. Similarly, in Genesis we are told that… Read more »
Trent
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Trent
May 18, 2011 3:38 PM

Or, just maybe it’s all utter bullshit.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous
May 18, 2011 5:43 PM

Or there are no gods at all. Given the fact that we can neither prove nor disprove deities, they are really irrelevant to the physical world – Maxwells equations et al.

I have no reason to assume Gods exist outside our minds and the colorful prose of our literature. Gods make an interesting topic for educational studies.

Nothing more.

Lawrence B. Crowell
Member
Lawrence B. Crowell
May 18, 2011 4:20 PM
To K. Carrell et al: The problem that I point out is largely with fundamentalist. One can consider the creation story as symbolic in some ways. There are other meanings to it, and it does involve the separation of dual entities, light from dark, dry land from sea, and so forth. This reflects the Jewish idea of Kodesh or separation, and that the distinction of categories is an aspect of a rational world, a world based on law given by God. Of course the 10 Commandments later has law given to man by God, just as God formed the world by law. However, the fundamentalist do have their point, or at least it can be understood even if… Read more »
Torbjorn Larsson OM
Member
Torbjorn Larsson OM
May 18, 2011 9:41 PM

Interesting (thanks for the Ba’al (el) explanation btw, wasn’t aware of that and it explains a lot), but I’m not sure monotheism only appeared once and the proposed connection seems tenuous.

A simpler explanation is that it was an idea that was timely (it concentrates power for one) and/or communicated around, like atheism originally.

Lawrence B. Crowell
Member
Lawrence B. Crowell
May 18, 2011 10:37 PM
If you read first and second Kings and Chronicles, there is this endless problem with Ba’al. BTW Ba’al should be pronounced in two syllables as Bah all, and not as commonly said as Bale. Ba’al was a male god, in a sense the brother of YHWH, which impregnated the Earth goddess Asharte, or Ashtareth etc, and the rains were that impregnation. The rain was seen as the semen from Ba’al which on the first or second rains would fertilize the Earth (Ashtarte) and bring forth life. The Ba’al religion had its base in the Phoenicians, and their southern relatives in Canaan held to largely the same religion. The god YHWH is some kluge between Ba’al of the local… Read more »
Kenneth Carrell
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Kenneth Carrell
May 19, 2011 2:14 AM
I agree that the problem does seem to be with fundamentalism. However, this is not exclusive to Christianity, and hatred and extreme views are also not limited to religion. A look at some of the comments here show that fact quite plainly – according to some people, anyone who is Christian or believes in God is automatically attacked or labelled in some way. In your post above you make it sound as if every Christian in America is a fundamentalist and is pissed off that people don’t believe in God or the Bible. From my view (as a Christian) that is not the case at all. And further, the problem seems to be exacerbated not by Christians promoting… Read more »
Anonymous
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Anonymous
May 19, 2011 3:20 AM
ken, i feel you nailed it on the head… people fail to realize the connection between both (science and religion) and fail to admit that GOD does exist in ALL of our lives and in EVERYTHING period regardless!!!! GOD is there no matter what!!!!!!! PEOPLE CHOSE TO IGNORE that god exiss for a variety of reasons and they are entitled to those reasons, however GOD is the only person each and everyone of us WILL CALL OUT TO when tough times are thrown at us!!!!! i don’t go to church, i don’t study the bible everyday, but in every breath i take i know that i am able to because GOD is allowing me to… People blame and… Read more »
Lawrence B. Crowell
Member
Lawrence B. Crowell
May 19, 2011 3:36 AM
The role of religion has not been entirely bad. The rise of monotheism, in particular Judaism, brought about the notion that the world operated by laws. The Genesis creation story does indicate that the world is in some ways rational. The flip side with respect to science is that religion entails a completely different mode of thought from science. Religion is primarily about faith, and science is about testing hypotheses. Hebrews 11 (I believe the chapter is 11) has faith is the certainty of things unseen. I am a bit too tired to get to by Bible to look it up for the exact quote. Science is about the opposite idea, we scrutinize things. The other problem which… Read more »
Kenneth Carrell
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Kenneth Carrell
May 19, 2011 5:05 AM
Religious claims about our universe can be wrong if the text is taken literally. But as we both agreed on earlier, much of the Bible speaks in metaphors, so it is not surprising that the literal interpretation of certain things in the Bible don’t match our current understanding of the universe – any metaphor would not hold up to such scrutiny. And most of the first several books in the Bible reflect very much the audience they were intended for. These people required laws to tell them what was good and bad for them to eat (for example) because modern concepts of bacteria and disease were unknown at that time. So why would knowledge of the universe as… Read more »
Potatoswatter
Guest
May 19, 2011 5:40 AM

The god which you know is a product of your own mind and local culture, and is a forgiving one who allows religious freedom.

Doomsday cultists would mostly disagree. Folks who get sucked into such groups do end up closely monitored, not by God but by their peers and leaders who interpret God’s word.

You need to accept the diversity of religions labelled “Christianity.”

Lawrence B. Crowell
Member
Lawrence B. Crowell
May 19, 2011 2:55 PM

I write my reply in a fresh start, for these columns are becoming too narrow. LC

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous
May 20, 2011 9:19 PM
I disagree with the notion that science involves belief. Take your multiverse point for instance. Certainly a part of me would like to “believe.” The idea that a counter version of me is somewhere sipping a latte reading a forum is amusing. However, if evidence mounts to the contrary then I will need to reevaluate this theory. There may not be a multiverse- and I am complete fine with that – I welcome it. You put it best when you said knowledge and ideas change with time. Can you say the same for yourself in relation to the Judaic god? Why is your belief so firm in such an entity’s existence? Could you in fact, if evidence permitted,… Read more »
WaxyMary
Member
WaxyMary
May 24, 2011 5:23 PM
@Carrell These people required laws to tell them what was good and bad for them to eat (for example) because modern concepts of bacteria and disease were unknown at that time. The reason given for these dietary laws at the time was to distinguish this group of people from the ‘crowd’ to make them special, a designed separation. It is also true that some of what we see happening then was healthful for the times. Much like the laws governing the members of the common gypsy tribe, any of them including the sea gypsy. The same can be said of any law which requires followers (only) to obey. Those laws which require non group members to submit are… Read more »
thomas deas
Guest
May 17, 2011 7:51 PM

iz this it???

Phillipee
Member
Phillipee
May 17, 2011 7:57 PM
IMHO – these people (Harold et al.) are engaged in a form child abuse too. I recently saw these people preparing for the end of the world in Jamaica (one last vacation before the big end?). I noticed their colorful t-shirts (the world is ending, etc) before I realized they were serious and actually believed this crap. I have been following along ever since ;.) At any rate, every morning I saw the children of these morons being indoctrinated and preached to by Harold and others: “The world is ending next month, only the pure go to heaven, etc, etc, etc”. It was sickening. I have no problem if someone wants to spout a bunch of craziness to… Read more »
Anonymous
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Anonymous
May 18, 2011 5:47 PM

The same could be said for taking your children to church, enrolling them in a Catholic school, or dropping them off at Sunday school.

It’s all just in the degree of parental ideological indoctrination.

Phillipee
Member
Phillipee
May 21, 2011 2:52 PM
Uncle Fred makes a good point but most religious people aren’t terrifying their children to this degree?? At least I hope not, I don’t have much experience or time for this so I really don’t know. Anyway, I felt bad about my initial post… too negative?? I am still hoping that later today (or perhaps tomorrow) these people realize they got caught up in a lie. I really hope they don’t move on to some future date, which is no doubt the way out of this… Ooops, I got the calculation wrong, it’s actually 5yrs from now!! p.s. My initial post says that I saw HAROLD preaching. After seeing him on TV I have to correct myself. I… Read more »
Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous
May 21, 2011 9:25 PM

It was not too negative at all. One could say any activity exposes yourself to ideological indoctrination. I would say the media has a habit of sensationalism. These extremists were in a Jamaican school probably because their were few opportunities to worth within the American school system.

I grew up in a religious community and I assure you that most are not extreme as this group. However, time has shown me that any stagnant beliefs system gives rise to a false world that seems perfectly normal to the believer but utterly removed from reality to those that don’t subscribe.

Torbjorn Larsson OM
Member
Torbjorn Larsson OM
May 17, 2011 9:26 PM
I presume the infographics is to illustrate failures, but the science motivated risks sound alarmist. Most of those risks have been around long without problem, some of them have happened repeatedly (climate change, supervolcanos, even galaxy collisions). On that list the current climate change is unprecedented in speed, so that is a bit outside known risk estimates. It is not the end of humanity, but maybe the end of the world as we knew it (new climate zones, mass extinctions, et cetera). the Y2K scare (which didn’t even burn out a light bulb), Well, people did work to prevent it. Documented problems were a bit more serious than a broken light bulb, including service interruptions and security problems.… Read more »
Rev. Daniel Blair
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Rev. Daniel Blair
May 17, 2011 9:53 PM

I am very sad for those who have been following this lie that the rapture will occur on May 21st. Even if they attempt to explain away “No one knows about that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven nor the Son, but only the Father” (Mark 13:32), they cannot explain away that most every Christian, theologian, scholar, and prophet from the first Century until the Nineteenth Century all believed that the church would go through the Great Tribulation and not escape through some secret rapture that would leave the world paralyzed. I pray that they will take a moment and read my book, “Final Warning” because the hour of is His judgment has come. http://www.revelation-truth.org

Potatoswatter
Guest
May 18, 2011 10:22 PM

Hard to tell from the website, but it looks like you wrote a book of general advice with an apocalyptic spin, or an attempt to capitalize on pre-existing fear of judgment.

People who want to be good will try to be good. People who want to believe the world will end tomorrow, usually do so because they want to be judged just as they are, or simply want their actions to be without consequence. These interests do not correlate will with self-improvement.

Aqua4U
Member
May 17, 2011 6:41 PM

The recent earthquake and tsunami in Japan is a close as I want to come to ‘the end of the world’… too close.

HelloBozos
Guest
HelloBozos
May 17, 2011 11:03 PM

This guy missed it, He was on the moon April,28,08

Ivan3man_At_Large
Member
Ivan3man_At_Large
May 17, 2011 11:14 PM

Camping has amassed $120 million in donations from fervent followers.

Religious cults can be summed up thus: Never in the field of human [capitalism] was so much [given] by so many to so few.

Victor Sheckels
Guest
May 19, 2011 1:23 AM

…for so little.

Victor Sheckels
Guest
May 19, 2011 1:23 AM

…for so little.

TomN
Guest
TomN
May 17, 2011 11:45 PM

The site that I refer people to is “A Brief History of the Apocalypse”. It goes back 4800 years to the earliest known prediction of “The End”
http://www.abhota.info/end1.htm

chrismonty
Guest
chrismonty
May 17, 2011 7:50 PM

Technically, Harold Camping says that only The Rapture will take place on May 21st. They don’t believe doomsday will actually occur until October 21, 2011…

http://www.blippitt.com/update-may-21st-is-judgment-day-but-world-will-end-on-october-21-2011/

Steven
Guest
Steven
May 18, 2011 12:22 AM
I have to correct the above information about 2008 God’s Final Witness written by Ronald Weinland. 2008 was supposedly Gods final witness to man. This period didn t end in 2008 but had just began September 30,2008. There was originally a belief that the 7th seal would open in April 17,2008 but Mr.Weinland claimed he had been given new revelation called the 50 truth of God that really makes anyone wonder how such timings could happen by fluke. You can read about this from his website publications section 57 Truths of God. The new timing is called the 50 truth http://www.cog-pkg.org/publications/truths.aspx Sorry to have to correct you but I have been keeping up with this situation and more… Read more »
Aaron Carey
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Aaron Carey
May 18, 2011 2:52 AM

Harold Camping’s guarantee that Jesus will come back on May 21, 2011 only shows his ignorance of the scripture. He wrongly assumes that Christ’s coming will be 7,000 years after Noah’s flood, something the Bible doesn’t say at at all. So he has no basis for his prediction even if his dating of the flood and its seven thousand year mark are correct.

Pavel Smutny
Guest
May 18, 2011 7:35 AM

Why people think, that doomsday, or big cataclysma would come during one day? If, so it is sequence of changes what are graduating within one,..year. Look at senmut.webs.com/apps/blog/

Andrew James
Member
May 18, 2011 8:58 AM

What an absolute load of drivel that is being written here! First the stupid 2012 nonsense, now this.
One thing is almost certain. If the world does end, he’ll take all these dipsticks out in one fell swoop.
Just automatically sterilise the lot of them I say. At least then they wouldn’t pass this rubbish onto their offspring.

wpDiscuz