Wormhole. Credit: Internet Encyclopedia of Science

Is Our Universe Inside Another Larger Universe?

Article Updated: 24 Dec , 2015

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A wormhole is a hypothetical “tunnel” connecting two different points in spacetime, and in theory, at each end of the wormhole there could be two universes. Theoretical physicist Nikodem Poplawski from Indiana University has taken things a step further by proposing that perhaps our universe could be located within the interior of a wormhole which itself is part of a black hole that lies within a much larger universe.

Whoa. I may have just lost my bearings.

As crazy as the concept of wormholes sounds, it does offer solutions to the equations of Einstein’s general theory of relativity. In fact, wormholes – also called an Einstein-Rosen Bridge — offer such a great solution that some theorists think that real wormholes may eventually be found or even created, and perhaps they could even be used for high-speed travel between two areas in space, or maybe even time travel.

However, a known property of wormholes is that they are highly unstable and would probably collapse instantly if even the tiniest amount of matter, such as a single photon, tried to travel though them.

But would it work – and could matter exist — if we were inside a wormhole inside a black hole inside another universe? Poplawski thinks so. He takes advantage of the Euclidean-based coordinate system called isotropic coordinates to describe the gravitational field of a black hole and to model the radial geodesic motion of a massive particle into a black hole.

“This condition would be satisfied if our universe were the interior of a black hole existing in a bigger universe,” Poplawski said. “Because Einstein’s general theory of relativity does not choose a time orientation, if a black hole can form from the gravitational collapse of matter through an event horizon in the future then the reverse process is also possible. Such a process would describe an exploding white hole: matter emerging from an event horizon in the past, like the expanding universe.”

So, a white hole would be connected to a black hole a wormhole, and is hypothetically the time reversal of a black hole. (Oh my, I’m now dizzy…)

Poplawski’s paper suggests that all astrophysical black holes, not just Schwarzschild and Einstein-Rosen black holes, may have Einstein-Rosen bridges, each with a new universe inside that formed simultaneously with the black hole.

“From that it follows that our universe could have itself formed from inside a black hole existing inside another universe,” he said.

IU theoretical physicist Nikodem Poplawski. Credit: Indiana University


By continuing to study the gravitational collapse of a sphere of dust in isotropic coordinates, and by applying the current research to other types of black holes, views where the universe is born from the interior of an Einstein-Rosen black hole could avoid problems seen by scientists with the Big Bang theory and the black hole information loss problem which claims all information about matter is lost as it goes over the event horizon (in turn defying the laws of quantum physics).

Poplawski theorizes that this model in isotropic coordinates of the universe as a black hole could explain the origin of cosmic inflation.

Could this be tested? Well, there is the issue that to see if an object could travel through a wormhole, the observer would have to be inside the wormhole as well, since the interior cannot be observed unless an observer enters or resides within.

A possible solution is that exotic matter wouldn’t collapse the wormhole, so we’d have to create – and be made of – exotic matter to keep the it open. But perhaps, as Poplawski proposes, if the wormhole is inside a black hole inside another universe it would work.

Anyone ready to give it a try?

Radial motion into an Einstein-Rosen bridge,” Physics Letters B, by Nikodem J. Poplawski. (Volume 687, Issues 2-3, 12 April 2010, Pages 110-113.

Sources: Indiana University
, Internet Encyclopedia of Science

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Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
J. Major
Member
April 7, 2010 1:46 PM

This may explain the popularity of reality television. I think this guy’s onto something.

Entropy4121
Member
April 7, 2010 3:21 PM

Oh, he’s on to something. He’s on a shuttle craft to Deep Space Nine!

trueman832
Member
trueman832
April 7, 2010 12:13 PM

….
ummm….
….
I can’t feel the left side of my body….

galactus
Member
galactus
April 7, 2010 1:32 PM

uh, ok

William928
Member
William928
April 7, 2010 3:42 PM

Not Deep Space Nine, Stargate SG 1, one of my favorite shows. Take me to the gate, I’ll go tomorrow!

Lawrence B. Crowell
Member
Lawrence B. Crowell
April 7, 2010 5:50 PM
To put some seriousness on this, there are reasons to presume connections between wormholes and black holes and cosmologies. I have only given Poplawski’s paper a a brief overview at this point. I will try to give a description of a wormhole. It is similar to a black hole from the standpoint of an observer on the outside. Gravity tends to focus the paths of particles inwards. There is a condition for this called the Hawking-Penrose energy condition, which basically says the energy E or T^{00} > or = 0. This energy condition for the wormhole is violated. Around where the black hole horizon is there is a shell of some sort, some exotic quantum field or matter,… Read more »
IVAN3MAN_AT_LARGE
Member
IVAN3MAN_AT_LARGE
April 7, 2010 7:21 PM

Well, this is not news to me because I’ve read of something similar almost eleven years ago: “World’s Top Scientists Ponder: What If The Whole Universe Is, Like, One Huge Atom?”

Uncle Fred
Member
Uncle Fred
April 7, 2010 9:02 PM

So then you are saying that Wormholes generate new universes rather than intersect two physical locations in a single cosmology?

Also, this notion of a Lancsoz function, I’m not sure I entirely understand it LC. In which spacial direction are the incoming particles directed towards if not “back out” of the wormhole’s gravity well? Are we adding dimensions here?

qraal
Member
April 7, 2010 11:54 PM
Hi Lawrence Poplawski is comparing the Schwarzschild metric and the Einstein-Rosen solutions for collapse of a dust sphere – how does that relate to the topology you mentioned? Sounds like you have more of a grasp of this stuff than me. One implication is that black-holes that form via a collapsar produce daughter universes “genetically” related to our own. I wonder if we produce million-ton black-holes as Louis Crane has discussed for stardrives if that’ll form an E-R bridge and give birth to a new “white-hole Big-Bang” on the other side of the event horizon? And would accelerator created black-holes – if such can be made – could form E-R bridges or would they Hawking decay before the… Read more »
frank
Member
frank
April 8, 2010 2:18 AM

What kind of universe(s) may be hidden in the black hole in the center of our galaxy, the milky way, probably the nearest located black hole from earth?

pfon71361
Member
pfon71361
April 8, 2010 2:35 AM

A infinite regression of such cosmological conditions may be implied given that there are Black Holes at the center of many galaxies in our universe. Everet’s quantum “many worlds” theory comes to mind as a identical consequence of these infinite universes.

Dark Gnat
Member
Dark Gnat
April 8, 2010 5:29 AM

Getting there would only be half the challenge, getting back would be just as difficult if not more so. Even if we just sent a probe, we wouldn’t learn anything from the other universe unless we could retrieve information.

Plus, would those universes behave the same way as ours – would physics be the same?

Another thing – if I’m understanding this correctly, can opening a wormhole [i]create[/i] an new universe? If so, could we manipulate anything within that universe? Muhahaha!

…and could that mean that this universe was “opened up” by intelligences in another universe? (I’m just saying, be prepared for some wild ideas)

This at least opens up a can of worms, if not a worm[i]hole[/i]!

Jean Tate
Member
April 8, 2010 9:44 AM

davesmith_au,

Plasma physics is a vital, and vibrant, part of contemporary astrophysics; for example, ADS returns nearly 900 entries with ‘plasma’ in the title in just the last year alone! None of that is in any way verboten here.

May I suggest that BAUT Forum’s Against the Mainstream section as a good place to present the ideas you seem to think are worthy of further discussion?

davesmith_au
Member
April 8, 2010 9:11 AM

It amazes me that this science fiction is OK, yet discussions of “that topic” which is based on lab experiments and observations, is verboten here. Perhaps you should be re-named Universes Today… Just sayin’!

solrey
Member
April 8, 2010 3:50 PM

“Today’s scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality”
Nikola Tesla

In a nutshell… GIGO.

Lawrence B. Crowell
Member
Lawrence B. Crowell
April 8, 2010 5:32 PM
@ qraal and others: The wormhole replaces the event horizon of a black hole, at least as seen from the outside, by a shell of negative energy, where each point on that shell is identified with another point on an identical shell somewhere else. This means the topology of spacetime, say a simple Euclidean R^4 at large becomes T^2xR^2, a torus (doughnut) in a Cartesian product with a 2-plane. This has a different topology than a flat R^4. Now just as the shell identifies every point on the exterior shell with points on an identical shell, it does the same with the interior region of what defined the black hole. So the interior is a three dimensional ball… Read more »
Uncle Fred
Member
Uncle Fred
April 8, 2010 6:46 PM

Indeed… I am still trying to wrap my head around how a string looks as it falls into a black hole – let alone what changes when it is a worm hole.

I was always under the impression that as the sting descends into the BH it appears to rope around around it, redshift, slow down, stretch and warp, and in the end… just merely fades away over a long period of time. Would this be correct? Of course, this is all from the perspective of the observer, not what actually transpires to the falling string.

Now the question would be… what does the string look like if it were falling to a stable macroscopic wormhole? (If one were possible).

Lawrence B. Crowell
Member
Lawrence B. Crowell
April 8, 2010 7:37 PM

That is pretty close to the idea. The string warps around near the horizon, on a stratched horizon, so it almost completely covers the black hole. In fact everything which composed the black hole, which are ultimately composed of strings, do the same.

Actually what this means is there are two entirely different descriptions of the same evaporation of the string. This becomes particularly relevant when the black hole is a quantum black hole. In this case the horizon fluctuates so the two descriptions are quantum mechanically in a superposition. This ultimately is a form of what might be called a hyper-quantum principle.

LC

IVAN3MAN_AT_LARGE
Member
IVAN3MAN_AT_LARGE
April 8, 2010 9:20 PM

RE: Nikola Tesla.

From Wikipedia:

In the years since his death, many of his innovations, theories and claims have been used, at times unsuitably and controversially, to support various fringe theories that are regarded as unscientific. Most of Tesla’s own work conformed with the principles and methods accepted by science, but his extravagant personality and sometimes unrealistic claims, combined with his unquestionable genius, have made him a popular figure among fringe theorists and believers in conspiracies about “hidden knowledge”.

Anaconda
Member
Anaconda
April 8, 2010 11:37 PM

A good example of the “crisis” in astronomy.

Pure fantasy dressed up as “science”.

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