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"The red Moon did not disappoint tonight," writes Arnar Kristjansson. Credit: Arnar Kristjansson

A Bloody Beautiful Supermoon Eclipse!

Article Updated: 23 Dec , 2015

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Like some of you, I outran the clouds just in time to catch last night’s total lunar eclipse. What a beautiful event! Here are some gorgeous pictures from our readers and Universe Today staff — souvenirs if you will — of the last total lunar eclipse anywhere until January 31, 2018. The sky got so dark, and the Moon hung like a plum in Earth’s shadow for what seemed a very long time. Did you estimate the Moon’s brightness on the Danjon Scale? My brother and I both came up with L=2 from two widely-separated locations; William Wiethoff in Hayward, Wisconsin rated it L=1. All three estimates would indicate a relatively dark eclipse.

Nicely-done sequence of eclipse phases taken early September 28, 2015. Credit: Own Llewellyn

Nicely-done sequence of eclipse phases taken early September 28, 2015. Click to enlarge. Credit: Own Llewellyn

The darkness of the umbra was particularly noticeable in the west quarter of the Moon in the giant volcanic plain known as Oceanus Procellarum. This makes sense as that portion of the Moon was located closest to the center of the Earth’s dark, inner umbra. The plain is also dark compared to the brighter lunar highlights, which being more reflective, formed a sort of pale ring around the northern rim of the lunar disk.

Salute to the eclipse! Credit: Jason Major

Salute to the final eclipse of the current tetrad that began 17 months ago.  Credit: Jason Major

The bottom or southern rim of the Moon, located farthest from the center of the umbra, appeared a lighter yellow-orange throughout totality.

Wide angle view of the Moon during totality in star-rich sky with the Aquila Milky visible at right. Credit: Bob King

Wide angle view of the Moon (lower left) during totality in a star-rich sky with the Aquila Milky Way visible at right. Credit: Bob King

This is just a small sampling of the excellent images arriving from our readers. More are flowing in on Universe Today’s Flickr site.  Thank you everyone for your submissions!

A crowd gather to watch the Moon during partial eclipse prior to totality. Credit: Robert Sparks

A crowd gather to watch the Moon during partial eclipse prior to totality. Credit: Robert Sparks

A hint of the penumbra shows in this photo. Hint: look near left top. Credit: Roger Hutchinson

A hint of the penumbra shows in this photo. Hint: look near left top. Credit: Roger Hutchinson

A bloody Moon iindeed! Credit: Chris Lyons

A bloody Moon iindeed! Notice how dark Oceanus Procellarum (top) appears. Credit: Chris Lyons

"Super Blood Moon". Credit: Alok SInghal

“Super Blood Moon”. Credit: Alok Singhal

Nice montage of images from eclipse start to finish. Credit: Mike Greenham

Nice montage of images from eclipse start to finish. Credit: Mike Greenham

One of the most awesome aspects of the eclipse was how many stars could be seen near the Moon. This picture was taken with a 100mm telesphoto lens. Credit: Bob King

One of the most awesome aspects of the eclipse was how many stars could be seen near the Moon. This picture was taken with a 100mm telesphoto lens. Credit: Bob King

Rare shot of the totally eclipsed Moon and bright meteor. Credit: VegaStar Carpentier Photography

Rare shot of the totally eclipsed Moon and bright meteor. Credit: VegaStar Carpentier Photography

A lucky break in the clouds made this photographer happy. Credit: Moe Ali

A lucky break in the clouds made this photographer happy. Credit: Moe Ali

Mary Spicer made exposures every 5 minutes. During totality the Moon dropped behind a tree so I had to relocate the camera, hence the small gap in the sequence. 35 shots in total, stacked using StarStax. Credit: Mary Spicer

Mary Spicer made exposures of the eclipsed Moon every 5 minutes. During totality, the Moon dropped behind a tree so she had to relocate the camera, hence the small gap in the sequence. 35 shots in total and stacked into one frame using StarStax. Credit: Mary Spicer

The Moon caught after totality between clouds through a small refracting telescope. Credit: Bob King

The Moon caught after totality between clouds through a small refracting telescope. Credit: Bob King

Another nice montage displaying all the partial phases, early, mid and late totality. Credit: Andre van der Hoeven

Another fine montage displaying all the partial phase plus early, mid and late totality. Credit: Andre van der Hoeven

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Brian Sheen
Member
Brian Sheen
September 28, 2015 11:01 AM

Hi Bob,

Thanks for that update, we too scaled the darkness of the eclipse as L=2 – so it must be right! Clouds came in for totality but cleared straight after of course. I thought the eclipse looked “awesome” in the period after the event with part of the disc covered only by the penumbra. Friends in Shetland and Nigeria got total cloud but Germany was much better placed. We were based in a girls school in Truro Cornwall, UK.
Roseland Observatory.

Aqua4U
Member
September 28, 2015 12:42 PM
WOW! Three of us piled into the car and drove up into the local mountains. The site I’d picked is where I go for star gazing with my telescope(s). At first the site looked perfect.. then time came for the moon to come up and it was hidden behind a mountain! ACK! Then Sean, a casual friend of 15 years, drove by and suggested we follow her to her home. So we did. The view from there was PERFECT! L=1(?) We hung out for a couple hours taking pics and looking at the eclipse with binocs. and 4″ scope…. suuweet! MY CAMERA wouldn’t even show the moon thru the viewfinder.. so that was a bust. BUT the wifey-poo’s… Read more »
UFOsMOTHER
Member
UFOsMOTHER
September 28, 2015 1:53 PM
What a Night we had an Astro Garden Party here in Belgium conditions were Perfect, At the height of the Eclipse the top of the Blood Red Supermoon was barely visible (L=1-) but had an Ever so Slight Ring around its circumference also like Bob I was surprised by the Huge amount of Stars visible close to the Moon it was also fantastic when at the later stages where the shadow of Earth was 1/2 way to the right so you had a Bright White on the Left of the Moon and a Musky Blood Red Colour (just like the wine we were drinking) on the right side until the Eclipse passed and the Moons Brightness was back… Read more »
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