ESA Marks 50 Years of Cooperative Space Innovation

by Jason Major on May 21, 2014

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In 1964 the European Launcher Development Organisation (ELDO) and the European Space Research Organisation (ESRO) were founded, on February 29 and March 20 respectively, marking the beginning of Europe as a major space power and player in the new international venture to explore beyond our planet. A decade later these two entities merged to become ESA, and the rest, as it’s said, is history.

The video above commemorates ESA’s service to the cooperation and innovation of European nations in space, and indeed the entire world with many of the far-reaching exploration missions its member states have developed, launched and maintained. From advanced communications and observational satellites to its many missions exploring the worlds of the Solar System to capturing the light from the beginning of the Universe, ELDO, ESRO, and ESA have pushed the boundaries of science and technology in space for half a century… and are inspiring the next generation to continue exploring into the decades ahead. So happy anniversary, ESA — I can only imagine what we might be looking back on in another 50 years!

Source: ESA. See more key dates from ESA’s history here

About 

A graphic designer in Rhode Island, Jason writes about space exploration on his blog Lights In The Dark, Discovery News, and, of course, here on Universe Today. Ad astra!

SteveZodiac May 22, 2014 at 4:07 AM

Well done ESA. Hipparcos, Huygens, Mars Express, Giotto, Cluster, Herschel, Planck, XMM-Newton, Rosetta, Gaia – all oustanding missions, but with 500 million people in the EU there should be a manned program.

nikolay May 22, 2014 at 11:30 AM

50 years proudly and successfully launching robots in space, but not humans… ESA should really have it’s own manned program, but with the current level of funding it’s not going to happen.

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