Eta Aquarid Meteors Streak By in Stunning Astrophotos

by Nancy Atkinson on May 8, 2014

Porters at Mt. Bromo in Indonesia warm themselves by a fire as an Eta Aquarid meteor streaks overhead on May 6, 2014. Credit and copyright: Justin Ng.

Porters at Mt. Bromo in Indonesia warm themselves by a fire as an Eta Aquarid meteor streaks overhead on May 6, 2014. Credit and copyright: Justin Ng.

The Eta Aquarid meteor shower has graced the skies this week and while this hasn’t been an exceptionally active shower, here are a few beautiful photos we’ve received. Above astrophotographer Justin Ng climbed Mount Bromo in Indonesia on May 6, and had to contend with interference from the active volcano.

“After having visited Mt. Bromo several times over the past two years, I must say it’s definitely much more active now and part of the night sky was obscured by the sulphur dioxide gas emitted from Mount Bromo when I took this shot,” Justin said via email. “At times, I was ‘consumed’ by the sulphur gas for several minutes due to the occasional change in wind direction and I could hardly breathe or kept my eyes opened when that happened. Despite these challenging shooting and viewing conditions, the natives or tourists will still ascend the steep stone staircase (approximately 253 concrete steps) that leads to the brim of the steaming, sulphurous, gaping caldera to catch a glimpse of the scenic sunrise every morning.”

Wow! This beautiful image is a result of stacking 4 images taken at different times facing at the same direction.

An Eta Aquarid meteor streaks out of Aquarius at left toward the Milky Way at right. Note the chnages in colour as the meteor travels from left to right and descends into our atmosphere, as seen from Arizona on the night of May 4/5, 2014. Credit and copyright: Alan Dyer/Amazing Sky Photography.

An Eta Aquarid meteor streaks out of Aquarius at left toward the Milky Way at right. Note the chnages in colour as the meteor travels from left to right and descends into our atmosphere, as seen from Arizona on the night of May 4/5, 2014. Credit and copyright: Alan Dyer/Amazing Sky Photography.

A lone Eta Aquarid meteor during the night of May 5, 2014. Credit and copyright: Astro Guillaume on Flickr.

A lone Eta Aquarid meteor during the night of May 5, 2014. Credit and copyright: Astro Guillaume on Flickr.

This image is an example of how sparse this meteor shower was this year. “After 547 shots during the night of 5, May 2014 before dawn, my camera has captured only one meteor from the Eta Aquarids meteor Shower!” wrote Astro Guillaume on Flickr.

About 

Nancy Atkinson is Universe Today's Senior Editor. She also works with Astronomy Cast, and is a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador.

Comments on this entry are closed.

Previous post:

Next post: