Supernova Sweeps Away Rubbish In New Composite Image

by Elizabeth Howell on April 11, 2014

The supernova remnant G352.7-0.1 in a composite image with X-rays from the Chandra X-Ray Telescope (blue), radio waves from the Very Large Array (pink), infrared information from the Spitzer Space Telescope (orange) and optical data from the Digital Sky Survey (white). Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Morehead State Univ/T.Pannuti et al.; Optical: DSS; Infrared: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Radio: NRAO/VLA/Argentinian Institute of Radioastronomy/G.Dubner

The supernova remnant G352.7-0.1 in a composite image with X-rays from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (blue), radio waves from the Very Large Array (pink), infrared information from the Spitzer Space Telescope (orange) and optical data from the Digital Sky Survey (white). Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Morehead State Univ/T.Pannuti et al.; Optical: DSS; Infrared: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Radio: NRAO/VLA/Argentinian Institute of Radioastronomy/G.Dubner

Shining 24,000 light-years from Earth is an expanding leftover of a supernova that is doing a great cleanup job in its neighborhood. As this new composite image from NASA reveals, G352.7-0.1 (G352 for short) is more efficient than expected, picking up debris equivalent to about 45 times the mass of the Sun.

“A recent study suggests that, surprisingly, the X-ray emission in G352 is dominated by the hotter (about 30 million degrees Celsius) debris from the explosion, rather than cooler (about 2 million degrees) emission from surrounding material that has been swept up by the expanding shock wave,” the Chandra X-Ray Observatory’s website stated.

“This is curious because astronomers estimate that G352 exploded about 2,200 years ago, and supernova remnants of this age usually produce X-rays that are dominated by swept-up material. Scientists are still trying to come up with an explanation for this behavior.”

More information about G352 is available in the Astrophysical Journal and also in preprint version on Arxiv.

Source: Chandra X-Ray Telescope

About 

Elizabeth Howell is the senior writer at Universe Today. She also works for Space.com, Space Exploration Network, the NASA Lunar Science Institute, NASA Astrobiology Magazine and LiveScience, among others. Career highlights include watching three shuttle launches, and going on a two-week simulated Mars expedition in rural Utah. You can follow her on Twitter @howellspace or contact her at her website.

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