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Blastoff of the Indian developed Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) on Nov. 5, 2013 from the Indian Space Research Organization’s (ISRO) Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, Sriharikota. Credit: ISRO

India’s First Mars Mission Launches Flawlessly on Historic Journey to the Red Planet

5 Nov , 2013

by

WOW MOM !
Blastoff of the Indian developed Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) on Nov. 5, 2013 from the Indian Space Research Organization’s (ISRO) Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, Sriharikota. Credit: ISRO[/caption]

India flawlessly launched its first ever mission to Mars today (Nov. 5) to begin a history making ten month long interplanetary voyage to the Red Planet that’s aimed at studying the Martian atmosphere and searching for methane after achieving orbit.

The Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) thundered to space atop the nations four stage Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) precisely on time at 14:38 hrs IST (9:08 UTC, 4:08 a.m. EST) from the Indian Space Research Organization’s (ISRO) Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, Sriharikota, off India’s east coast.

“Our journey to Mars begins now!” announced an elated ISRO Chairman K. Radhakrishnan at the ISRO spaceport during a live broadcast of MOM’s launch from the mission control center. “We achieved orbit and we can all be proud.”

Flawless liftoff of India’s Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) on Nov. 5, 2013 from the Indian Space Research Organization’s (ISRO) Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, Sriharikota. Credit: ISRO

Flawless liftoff of India’s Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) on Nov. 5, 2013 from the Indian Space Research Organization’s (ISRO) Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, Sriharikota. Credit: ISRO

This was the 25th launch of India’s highly reliable 44 meter (144 foot) tall PSLV booster.

The 700,000 pound thrust PSLV rocket launched in its most powerful, extended XL version with six strap on solid rocket motors.

Launch of India’s Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) on Nov. 5, 2013 from Sriharikota, India. Credit: ISRO

Launch of India’s Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) on Nov. 5, 2013 from Sriharikota, India. Credit: ISRO

“I’m extremely happy to announce that the PSLV-C25 vehicle has placed the Mars orbiter spacecraft very precisely into an elliptical orbit around Earth of 247 x 23556 kilometers with an inclination of 19.2 degrees,” Radhakrishnan said, after “much meticulous planning and hard work by everyone.”

ISRO announced that MOM separated from the PSLV 4th stage as planned some 44 minutes after liftoff and that the solar panels successfully deployed.

Confirmation of the 4th stage ignition and spacecraft separation was transmitted by ship-borne terminals aboard a pair of specially dispatched tracking ships – SCI Nalanda and SCI Yamuna – stationed by ISRO in the South Pacific Ocean.

India’s Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) streaks to orbit after launch on Nov. 5, 2013.  Credit: ISRO

India’s Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) streaks to orbit after launch on Nov. 5, 2013. Credit: ISRO

MOM was designed and developed by the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) in near record time after receiving approval from the Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh in August 2012.

“No mission is beyond our capability”, said Radhakrishnan. “MOM is a huge step taking India beyond Earth’s influence for the first time.”

A series of six burns over the next month will raise the apogee and put MOM on a trajectory for Mars around December 1.

Following a 300 day interplanetary cruise phase, the do or die Mars orbital insertion firing by the main engine on September 24, 2014 will place MOM into an 366 km x 80,000 km elliptical orbit.

If all continues to goes well with MOM, India will join an elite club of four who have launched probes that successfully investigated the Red Planet from orbit or the surface – following the Soviet Union, the United States and the European Space Agency (ESA).

MOM is the first of two new Mars orbiter science probes from Earth blasting off for the Red Planet this November. Half a globe away, NASA’s $671 Million MAVEN orbiter remains on target to launch barely two weeks after MOM on Nov. 18 – from Cape Canaveral, Florida.

The 1,350 kilogram (2,980 pound) MOM orbiter is also known as ‘Mangalyaan’ – which in Hindi means ‘Mars craft.’

Graphic shows MOM’s initial orbit around Earth after successful Nov. 5 launch. Credit: ISRO

Graphic shows MOM’s initial orbit around Earth after successful Nov. 5 launch. Credit: ISRO

Although the main objective is a demonstration of technological capabilities, the probe is equipped with five indigenous instruments to conduct meaningful science – including a multi color imager and a methane gas sniffer to study the Red Planet’s atmosphere, morphology, mineralogy and surface features. Methane on Earth originates from both geological and biological sources – and could be a potential marker for the existence of Martian microbes.

MOM’s 15 kg (33 lb) science suite comprises:

MCM: the tri color Mars Color Camera images the planet and its two tiny moons, Phobos and Deimos

LAP: the Lyman Alpha Photometer measures the abundance of hydrogen and deuterium to understand the planets water loss process

TIS: the Thermal Imaging Spectrometer will map surface composition and mineralogy

MENCA: the Mars Exospheric Neutral Composition Analyser is a quadrapole mass spectrometer to analyze atmospheric composition

MSM: the Methane Sensor for Mars measures traces of potential atmospheric methane down to the ppm level.

Scientists will be paying close attention to whether MOM detects any atmospheric methane to compare with measurements from NASA’s Curiosity rover – which found ground level methane to be essentially nonexistent – and Europe’s upcoming 2016 ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter.

MOM and MAVEN will arrive nearly simultaneously in Mars orbit next September – joining Earth’s invasion fleet of five operational orbiters and intrepid surface rovers currently unveiling the mysteries of the Red Planet.

Both MAVEN and MOM’s goal is to study the Martian atmosphere , unlock the mysteries of its current atmosphere and determine how, why and when the atmosphere and liquid water was lost – and how this transformed Mars climate into its cold, desiccated state of today.

Although they were developed independently and have different suites of scientific instruments, the MAVEN and MOM science teams will “work together” to unlock the secrets of Mars atmosphere and climate history, MAVEN’s top scientist told Universe Today.

“We have had some discussions with their science team, and there are some overlapping objectives,” Bruce Jakosky told me. Jakosky is MAVEN’s principal Investigator from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

“At the point where we [MAVEN and MOM] are both in orbit collecting data we do plan to collaborate and work together with the data jointly,” Jakosky said.

The $69 Million ‘Mangalyaan’ mission is expected to continue gathering measurements at the Red Planet for about six to ten months and hopefully much longer.

Stay tuned here for continuing MAVEN and MOM news and my MAVEN launch reports from on site at the Kennedy Space Center press center.

Ken Kremer

It’ s a Mind-Blowing Midnight Marvel !  Fueled PSLV rocket and India’s Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) awaits Nov. 5 blastoff.  Credit: ISRO.  Watch ISRO’s Live  Webcast

It’ s a Mind-Blowing Midnight Marvel ! Fueled PSLV rocket and India’s Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) await Nov. 5 blastoff. Credit: ISRO

…………….

Learn more about MAVEN, MOM, Mars rovers, Orion and more at Ken’s upcoming presentations

Nov 14-19: “MAVEN Mars Launch and Curiosity Explores Mars, Orion and NASA’s Future”, Kennedy Space Center Quality Inn, Titusville, FL, 8 PM

Dec 11: “Curiosity, MAVEN and the Search for Life on Mars”, “LADEE & Antares ISS Launches from Virginia”, Rittenhouse Astronomical Society, Franklin Institute, Phila, PA, 8 PM

Blastoff of the Indian developed Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) on Nov. 5, 2013 from the Indian Space Research Organization’s (ISRO) Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, Sriharikota. Credit: ISRO

Blastoff of the Indian developed Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) on Nov. 5, 2013 from the Indian Space Research Organization’s (ISRO) Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, Sriharikota. Credit: ISRO

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Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Mark Thomas
Guest
Mark Thomas
November 5, 2013 7:44 AM

Good work India!

Vasilakis Kailas
Guest
Vasilakis Kailas
November 5, 2013 8:16 AM

Another “competitor” at space race. Well done India. smile

zlop
Guest
zlop
November 8, 2013 4:51 PM

Advancing human aspirations.

Shashank Kumar
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Shashank Kumar
November 5, 2013 8:34 AM

GO! GO!! GO!!! GO!!!!

The Latinist
Guest
The Latinist
November 5, 2013 1:28 PM

The more the merrier, I say.

Kevin
Member
Kevin
November 5, 2013 3:34 PM

We’re all on this planet together!

Funk Omen
Guest
Funk Omen
November 5, 2013 2:10 PM

wow…surprised me…speechless!!

Kevin
Member
Kevin
November 5, 2013 3:33 PM

Godspeed India!

John Rock
Guest
John Rock
November 5, 2013 5:06 PM

India – The Birthplace of mathematics (Trigonometry, Calculus, Arithmetic, Decimal system, Geometry, numbers 0 to 9), Science, High philosophies, Metallurgy, Linguistics, Medicine and Surgery

Incredible India. Thank you for your contribution for the betterment of humanity

Nexus
Member
November 5, 2013 6:18 PM

India can rightly feel proud of this accomplishment. Let’s hope the rest of the mission goes just as smoothly.

thomasguide
Member
thomasguide
November 6, 2013 9:32 PM

If their math is as good as their tech support then the probe will crash into mercury.

Nexus
Member
November 6, 2013 9:48 PM

You really are a nasty person, aren’t you?

thomasguide
Member
thomasguide
November 7, 2013 6:06 PM

I try.

Nexus
Member
November 7, 2013 6:15 PM

I think you’re worthless, and you know you’re worthless, and the only way you can feel good about yourself is to imagine that everyone else is as bad as you.

thomasguide
Member
thomasguide
November 7, 2013 6:54 PM

That’s funny cause I don’t feel worthless. I feel pretty good.

Edison A Thomas
Guest
Edison A Thomas
November 8, 2013 6:56 AM

ofcourse as mentioned you feel good as under developed dick still mingling with intestinal feaces & urinal piss . LOL

qanit_takmeel
Guest
qanit_takmeel
November 7, 2013 4:54 PM

lol. Big words coming from a person who needs tech support!

thomasguide
Member
thomasguide
November 7, 2013 6:06 PM

I wouldn’t need it if these software companies didn’t put out bug riddled crap.

bhartiya888
Guest
bhartiya888
November 8, 2013 12:23 AM

well that would still be an achievement… smile

thomasguide
Member
thomasguide
November 8, 2013 12:46 AM

Great achievement.

thomasguide
Member
thomasguide
November 5, 2013 7:16 PM

Seriously? India ? Wouldn’t that money be better spent removing feces off your streets?

Jeet
Guest
Jeet
November 5, 2013 10:40 PM
@thomasguide:disqus If that is the only idea you have on spending money then you definitely do not have the full picture of India. A country cannot spend money only to remove its poverty. It also needs to “invest” money on projects like these that inspire common citizens to choose their career. These moves also have their commercial benefits considering ISRO generally makes profits on contracts awarded to it. If this mission is successful, this is a big publicity for them (after the Chandrayan mission). Moreover, India can be more involved in joint collaborations in space research/exploration with other countries that can improve trade, foreign relations and of course, jobs. So you see, a country like India can find… Read more »
ascha
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ascha
November 6, 2013 12:04 AM

Appreciate you concern. But why you cannot appreciate an accomplishment or is it jealousy of an underdeveloped nation !!!. The cost is less than 1/4th of F-22 jet or less than rafale fighers India is is planning to buy..

Khagesh
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Khagesh
November 6, 2013 2:36 AM

Ooh man ! not again ! not here !

harpat
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harpat
November 6, 2013 3:30 AM
It would be better if it was possible. But India has a horrible problem of huge population and no energy resources (except dirty unusable coal). Without energy, it is not easy to pump water for toilets. Until the energy problem is solved, sanitation will be a nightmare. Most people don’t even have water connection. The only way out is develop some high technology so India can export enough to pay for oil. Satellite launching, software technology etc bring some revenue but not enough. The per capita consumption of oil or equivalent is about 3 or 4% of that in developed country. Indian currency is not accepted in world trade like the US dollar is so they cannot run… Read more »
Santosh
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Santosh
November 7, 2013 6:00 AM

My dear friends please wait unitl 2030 the scenario will change. The developed countries too more than hundred years to become “Developed” If you go back to the ancient history India was the most developed country then.. smile) So please give us some more time folks. George Washington became the first President of US in 1789. India got independence only in 1947. US is 158 years ahead of India.. India will take another 15-20 years to reach that level..

Vikram Singh
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Vikram Singh
November 6, 2013 3:31 AM

Thomas..do u have any idea about total expenditure on project?….Indians spend 50 times of the cost on Diwali crackers…It was result of meticulous planning and hard work by all the scientist…

Mohit Gupta
Guest
Mohit Gupta
November 10, 2013 2:03 AM

Wouldn’t it be better if your parents used the condoms on that fateful night when your “mini me” completed the journey from your dad’s instrument to your mom’s store. ?

thomasguide
Member
thomasguide
November 10, 2013 11:02 AM

You should talk, condoms should mandatory in your country of a billion. A billion morons that is.

thomasguide
Member
thomasguide
November 10, 2013 11:04 AM

And my instrument is in your mothers mouth that’s after I pulled it out of her rear end.

collinnyo145
Guest
collinnyo145
November 6, 2013 10:11 AM

My Uncle James just got an
almost new black BMW X4 SUV by working parttime online… my sources
J­a­m­2­0­.­?­o­m

The Pen
Guest
The Pen
November 6, 2013 11:23 AM

Nice work India. I hope the probe has a safe journey. Kudos to India.

thomasguide
Member
thomasguide
November 6, 2013 9:26 PM

Space and mars are the absolute last thing India should be wasting money on.

Edison A Thomas
Guest
Edison A Thomas
November 8, 2013 7:08 AM

You creep , again !
I would like india to waste money on a 75k $ drain to your mouth for your favorite – faeces & piss grin LOL

thomasguide
Member
thomasguide
November 6, 2013 9:30 PM

What is there to be jealous of? When you’ve solved all your problems then send as many probes to mars or anywhere else. How does this launch benefit the Indian people?

Panakkal Chandramohan
Guest
Panakkal Chandramohan
November 6, 2013 10:17 PM

Only when U tests nucs and send rockets you are a superpower
This is great advertisement for India.Indian goods will be sold around world and there will be exports and more employment
More over 95% money spend on MOM is spend in India only and created morew jobs for Indians.

ascha
Guest
ascha
November 7, 2013 6:54 AM

If we have solved the food problem in India then US would have the food problem as US presidemt says that US food prices are going up as Indians are eating more.

http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2008-05-03/developmental-issues/27761000_1_food-prices-energy-costs-middle-class

thomasguide
Member
thomasguide
November 6, 2013 9:34 PM

How does it benefit the Indian people?

Watcher Watcher
Guest
Watcher Watcher
November 7, 2013 5:42 AM

Isnt it a stupid question how technology can benefit people… at least on a technology website? India used space technology in weather forecasting, communications, resource tracking and many other things. ISRO itself makes a profit of $1.2b through its commercial wing by launching satellites. so they have the right to use the money to pursue better technologies. each department has its own priorities. $20b is spent on food security alone in India and a lot of billions on other welfare systems.

the one
Guest
the one
November 7, 2013 5:47 AM

That is what they said when India sent satellite in the 1970… But today more than a 100000 where saved in one of the states from a cyclone stronger than Sandy… Just imagine the loss if the warning was not available. We can say that the amount spent on this was earned by saving those people thereby. saving some financial loss. ISRO earned the amount and has the right to do more research and use it as it likes to use. Imagine 100 years down the line if minerals have to be bought back from Mars. Indian rockets can do it in at the cost that you make a movie..

Vikram Singh
Guest
Vikram Singh
November 8, 2013 3:36 AM
The widespread joy in India at the launch of the country’s Mars orbiter, Mangalyaan, should not be mistaken for vanity or escapism, however. Patriotic Indians are acutely aware of the rising profile of their country in global economics and geopolitics, alongside other emerging powers belonging to BRICS and similar groups. Every milestone in advanced rocket science, literally a rarefied and sophisticated field that few nations can master, is a shot in the arm for national self-confidence, showing that India is headed for global leadership. When the chips are down, or if there is a national calamity, memories of the Mars orbiter blazing a trail in the sky will sustain the faith that the future belongs to India.
krishna murti
Guest
krishna murti
November 6, 2013 9:49 PM

Great India GREAT, you are pride of Asia.

AndyLC
Guest
AndyLC
November 7, 2013 2:29 AM

The Hollywood film Gravity took 100 million dollars to make.
India’s mission to mars took 75 million dollars to fund.

… it costs more to make movies about space, than to actually go to mars. Good job India!

thomasguide
Member
thomasguide
November 7, 2013 7:14 PM

Yes but Gravity didn’t crash and burn it made the money back and a tidy profit for the company that produced it. What will this mission bring back?

bhartiya888
Guest
bhartiya888
November 8, 2013 12:22 AM

ISRO make around 10 Billion USD profit by launching satellites from other countries. i am sure 60 million USD is just fine for R&D even if it burns dead.

thomasguide
Member
thomasguide
November 8, 2013 12:27 AM

That’s nice where did you get that from? Your ass?

bhartiya888
Guest
bhartiya888
November 8, 2013 12:52 AM

check the commercial arms of ISRO called Antrix. it is public limited company and data is available in their financial results.

Edison A Thomas
Guest
Edison A Thomas
November 8, 2013 6:55 AM

@Thomas guide : Seems you dick is still strugglling for threshold to
get outta epiderm to be something meaningful to this world ! you are
still inside your world struggling with your intestinal faeces and
bladder piss ( as you spill over posting here allover wink must be a
jealous terrorist , is it ?

the one
Guest
the one
November 7, 2013 5:51 AM
To all the people who say why is India wasting Money. Well! that is what they said when India sent satellite in the 1970… But today more than a 100000 people where saved in one of the states from a cyclone stronger than Sandy because of early warning and tracking from india’s satellite program and Just imagine the loss if the warning was not available. We can say! that the amount spent on this was earned by saving those people and from financial loss. ISRO earned the amount and has the right to do more research and use it as it likes. Imagine 100 years down the line if minerals have to be bought back from Mars. Indian… Read more »
thomasguide
Member
thomasguide
November 7, 2013 5:53 PM

Wow you dream big. What minerals exactly are they going to bring back ? Your argument is silly. Mars is a pipe dream and a giant waste of money. This goes for all countries not just India.

bhartiya888
Guest
bhartiya888
November 8, 2013 12:30 AM

dude.. do you need to put your nasty comments in each post? i get it you didn’t like it. now shutup

Achintya Biswas
Guest
Achintya Biswas
November 7, 2013 7:17 AM

India achieves ISRO go on … the nation is with you

Rick
Guest
Rick
November 7, 2013 7:41 AM

Sometimes I have to wonder, what drives people like you to make such asinine comments. I really enjoy reading comments from people who have something to say. It’s comments like yours that turns me off. It’s easy to make off the cuff crude comments but requires a little more thought to provoke interest.

thomasguide
Member
thomasguide
November 7, 2013 6:15 PM

Judging from the responses it looks like I have provoked of interest.

bhartiya888
Guest
bhartiya888
November 8, 2013 1:01 AM

its not a complement dude. you pissed off one sixth of humanity.

Omegazad
Guest
Omegazad
November 7, 2013 11:08 AM

Yeah…. Keep telling yourself that

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