LRO Images Apollo 12 Landing Site

Article written: 3 Sep , 2009
Updated: 24 Dec , 2015
by

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Back in July when the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter team released stunning images from several Apollo landing sites, it was not possible at that time to image the Apollo 12 site, the westernmost landing site, due to operational constraints. But now LRO has taken a good look at Oceanus Procellarum and the wait was well worth it. Easily and clearly visible are the Lunar Module descent stage and Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP), along with astronaut tracks, and the Surveyor 3 spacecraft.

“There are only so many locations that can be imaged at one time,” said Mark Robinson, principal investigator of LRO’s Camera, LROC. “Not every target can be imaged every time around. I’m glad we had to wait another month, it was very exciting to see this image a month after the excitement of the first round of Apollo landing sites.”

LRO is slated to orbit the moon for at least another 12 months, which means Robinson and his team have many more imaging opportunities ahead of them. In mid-September the spacecraft’s orbit will be lowered, allowing LROC to acquire even higher resolution images of the Apollo and Surveyor landing sites.

For higher resolution images and more info about about the Apollo 12 site, check out the LRO website.

Sources: LRO, ASU


9 Responses

  1. Member

    Wow, those Apollo 12 astronauts sure did leave a lot of cardboard arrow cutouts behind!

    Hehe 🙂

    Awesome view, I love the fact we can still see the footprints of guys who hopped on the lunar surface 40 years ago. I can’t think of another example where this is possible.

    Cheers,

    Ian

  2. Nexus says

    I think you’ve posted in the wrong thread.

  3. ILOVETHESTAR says

    HeadAroundU as Nexus says, you must be in the wrong thread.

  4. Bill Samson says

    I bet the “Apollo Hoax” fools are scratching their heads (and getting splinters) about this one!

    Oh yes – You can fake anything with PhotoShop – Right? Wish somebody would ‘fake’ these time-wasters out of the picture.

    Gimme strength!

  5. Dumb_bautian says

    I feel sorry for you if you think that this is real proof we were on the Moon.

    Just few pixels on the image, thats it?

    HOW MANY SATELLITES HAVE BEEN ORBITING THE MOON SO FAR???

    And none of them can provide decent image of the any Apollo site?!

    Just think about it… if you can’t then keep jumping in joy next time you see few more pixels on the image from the Moon.

    I don’t think this message will be approved but its worth trying.

  6. Torbjorn Larsson OM says

    HOW MANY SATELLITES HAVE BEEN ORBITING THE MOON SO FAR???

    HOW DO YOU KNOW THAT SATELLITES HAVE BEEN ORBITING THE MOON???

    Potentially photoshopped images aren’t proof of satellites. You are all hoaxers, aren’t you. 😀

  7. theCase says

    Does anyone know approximately where this appears in the raw image? (meaning, the long vertical strip photo that accompanies the closeup)?

    I’d like to see the overall landscape then zoom in to the landing site. Seems a bit odd that they provide the closeup, then such a large strip of photo and say “it’s in there somewhere! honest!”.

    Thanks!

  8. Member
    IVAN3MAN says

    @ Dumb_bautian,

    I suggest that you read this.

  9. @theCase:

    I found it here http://wms.lroc.asu.edu/lroc_browse/view/M104662862R and found the Apollo 12 site quite easily by zooming in on the “Zoomify” page. The landing site is not quite halfway down the long strip. Unfortunately, the page doesn’t provide coordinates.

    Nancy

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