GRAIL

Moon’s Blotchy Near Side Has Bigger Craters Than Expected

by Elizabeth Howell November 13, 2013

The familiar blotches that make up “the man in the moon”, from the vantage point of Earth, happened because the moon’s crust is thinner on the near side than the far side to our planet, new research reveals. Elizabeth Howell on Google+

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Moon’s Variable Gravity Came From Ancient Impacts

by Elizabeth Howell May 31, 2013

The moon’s gravity has been a headache ever since the Apollo era. Areas of “mass concentration” or mascons, discovered in 1968, affected spacecraft orbits and made landing on Earth’s neighbor a tricky challenge. The phenomenon has puzzled scientists, but new data shows that mascons might have come to be after asteroids or comets hit the […]

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NASA: Reaches for New Heights – Greatest Hits Video

by Ken Kremer January 25, 2013

Video Caption: At NASA, we’ve been a little busy: landing on Mars, developing new human spacecraft, going to the space station, working with commercial partners, observing the Earth and the Sun, exploring our solar system and understanding our universe. And that’s not even everything.Credit: NASA Check out this cool action packed video titled “NASA: Reaching […]

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New Video Shows the GRAIL MoonKAM’s Final Looks at the Moon

by Nancy Atkinson January 10, 2013

As a fond farewell, here are some of the final images taken by the GRAIL MoonKAM educational cameras on board Ebb and Flow, the twin spacecraft for the mission. This footage was shot just three days prior to when the mission ended with the planned impacts on a rim of a crater near the lunar […]

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End of Mission: GRAIL Spacecraft Impact a Mountain on the Moon

by Nancy Atkinson December 18, 2012

The planned path of the GRAIL spacecrafts’ final orbit. Credit: NASA “So long, Ebb and Flow, and we thank you,” said GRAIL project manager David Lehman of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory after the twin GRAIL spacecraft completed a planned formation-flying double impact into the southern face of 2.5-kilometer- (1.5-mile-) tall mountain on a crater rim […]

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