Gamma rays

Weekly Space Hangout – January 10, 2014: Wake Up, Rosetta! & Top Stories from AAS

by Fraser Cain January 10, 2014

Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter Host: Fraser Cain Guests: David Dickinson, Amy Shira Teitel, Scott Lewis, Brian Koberlein, special guest Ruth McAvinia from the ESA This week’s stories: Ruth: Wake up, Rosetta! Facebook link to contest David: AAS-Gamma Ray Gravitational Lens AAS-Death by Black Hole Antares […]

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Navy Researchers Put Dark Lightning to the SWORD

by Jason Major June 13, 2013

Discovered “by accident” by NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in 2010, dark lightning is a surprisingly powerful — yet invisible — by-product of thunderstorms in Earth’s atmosphere. Like regular lightning, dark lightning is the result of a natural process of charged particles within storm clouds trying to cancel out opposing charges. Unlike normal lightning, though, […]

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Bright Blazar’s Emission Defies Explanations

by Tammy Plotner April 18, 2013

When it comes to sheer wattage, blazars definitely rule. As the brightest of active galactic nuclei, these sources of extreme high-energy gamma rays are usually associated with relativistic jets of material spewing into space and enabled by matter falling into a host galaxy’s black hole. The further away they are, the dimmer they should be, […]

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Black Holes, Fermi Bubbles and the Milky Way

by Tammy Plotner March 6, 2013

Deep at the heart of our galaxy lurks a black hole. This isn’t exciting news, but neither is it a very exciting place. Or is it? While all might be quiet on the western front now, there may be evidence that our galactic center was once home to some pretty impressive activity – activity which […]

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Watch Live Webcast: Cosmic Rays and Exploding Stars

by Nancy Atkinson February 28, 2013

Scientists have know about cosmic rays for a century. But these high-energy subatomic particles, which stream through space at nearly the speed of light and crash into the Earth’s upper atmosphere, have been mostly a mystery. The primary reason: researchers have been unable to tell where they come from, or how they’re born. But new […]

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