flyby

Amateur Images Show Juno’s ‘Slingshot’ Around Earth Was a Success

by Nancy Atkinson October 10, 2013

With the government shutdown, news out of NASA is sometimes sparse. But thankfully amateur astronomers can fill in some of the holes! While Juno’s project manager Rick Nybakken has confirmed that the spacecraft successfully completed its slingshot flyby of Earth yesterday, images taken by amateur astronomers around the world also conclusively confirm that Juno is […]

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Could Juno’s Path Near Earth Uncover A Flyby Mystery?

by Elizabeth Howell October 9, 2013

Every so often, engineers send a spacecraft in Earth’s general direction to pick up a speed boost before heading elsewhere. But sometimes, something strange happens — the spacecraft’s speed varies in an unexpected way. Even stranger, this variation happens only during some Earth flybys. Elizabeth Howell on Google+

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A Parting Look at 2012 DA14: Was This a Warning Shot from Space?

by Jason Major February 18, 2013

Just as anticipated, on Friday, Feb. 15, asteroid 2012 DA14 passed us by, zipping 27,000 kilometers (17,000 miles) above Earth’s surface — well within the ring of geostationary weather and communications satellites that ring our world. Traveling a breakneck 28,100 km/hr (that’s nearly five miles a second!) the 50-meter space rock was a fast-moving target for […]

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In Two Weeks This 50-Meter Asteroid Will Buzz Our Planet

by Jason Major January 30, 2013

 Asteroid 2012-DA14 will pass Earth closely on Feb. 15, 2013 (NASA) On February 15 a chunk of rock about 50 meters wide will whiz by Earth at nearly 8 km/s, coming within 27,680 km of our planet’s surface — closer than many weather and communications satellites. For those of you more comfortable with imperial units, […]

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Titan Shines in Latest Cassini Shots

by Jason Major December 3, 2012

Color-composite raw image of Titan’s southern hemisphere. Note the growing south polar vortex. (NASA/JPL/SSI/Jason Major) Last Thursday, November 29, Cassini sailed past Titan for yet another close encounter, coming within 1,014 kilometers (603 miles) of the cloud-covered moon in order to investigate its thick, complex atmosphere. Cassini’s Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), Composite Infrared […]

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