X-Ray Astronomy

Dense Gas Clouds Blot The View Of Supermassive Black Holes

by Elizabeth Howell February 20, 2014

Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter Gas around supermassive black holes tends to clump into immense clouds, periodically blocking the view of these huge X-ray sources from Earth, new research reveals. Observations of 55 of these “galactic nuclei” revealed at least a dozen times when an X-ray […]

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Stars Boil Before They Blow Up, Says NuSTAR

by Jason Major February 19, 2014

Supernovas are some of the most energetic and powerful events in the observable Universe. Briefly outshining entire galaxies, they are the final, dying  outbursts of stars several times more massive than our Sun. And while we know supernovas are responsible for creating the heavy elements necessary for everything from planets to people to power tools, […]

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New Findings from NuSTAR: A New X-Ray View of the “Hand of God” and More

by David Dickinson January 10, 2014

One star player in this week’s findings out of the 223rd meeting of the American Astronomical Society has been the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array Mission, also known as NuSTAR. On Thursday, researchers revealed some exciting new results and images from the mission, as well as what we can expect from NuSTAR down the road. Remove […]

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Chandra’s Verdict on the Demise of a Star: “Death by Black Hole”

by David Dickinson January 9, 2014

This week, astronomers announced the detection of a rare event, a star being torn to shreds by a massive black hole in the heart of a distant dwarf galaxy. The evidence was presented Wednesday January 8th at the ongoing 223rd meeting of the American Astronomical Society being held this week in Washington D.C. Remove this […]

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Rare White Dwarf Systems Do A Doubletake

by Tammy Plotner December 20, 2013

For those of us who remain forever fascinated by astronomy, nothing could spark our imaginations more than a cosmic curiosity. In this case, the unusual object is a star cataloged as AM Canum Venaticorum (AM CVn) located in the constellation of Canes Venatici. What makes this dual star system of interest? Try the fact that […]

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