Where In The Universe Challenge #140

by Nancy Atkinson on March 9, 2011

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It’s time once again for another Where In The Universe Challenge. Name where in the Universe this image was taken and give yourself extra points if you can name the telescope or spacecraft responsible for the image. Post your guesses in the comments section, and check back on later at this same post to find the answer. To make this challenge fun for everyone, please don’t include links or extensive explanations with your answer. Good luck!

UPDATE: The answer has been posted below.

This is the nebula BFS 29 surrounding the star CE-Camelopardalis, as seen by the WISE spacecraft. This nebula can be found hovering in the band of the night sky comprising the Milky Way. “BFS” stands for Blitz, Fich, and Stark — the three astronomers who identified and cataloged this nebula back in 1982. The “29” means that it’s the 29th object in their catalog. Learn more about this image on the WISE website.

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Nancy Atkinson is Universe Today's Senior Editor. She also is the host of the NASA Lunar Science Institute podcast and works with Astronomy Cast. Nancy is also a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador.

J. Major March 9, 2011 at 3:32 PM

Nebula in Camelopardalis, by WISE!

HeadAroundU March 9, 2011 at 3:14 PM

redhead nebula

IVAN3MAN_AT_LARGE March 9, 2011 at 6:13 PM

It’s the image of the nebula BFS 29 surrounding the star CE-Camelopardalis, as seen by NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE).
:cool:

IVAN3MAN_AT_LARGE March 9, 2011 at 6:15 PM

P.S. I’m back!

Nancy Atkinson March 10, 2011 at 8:17 AM

I was wondering where you’ve been!

HeadAroundU March 10, 2011 at 10:56 PM

He was spellchecking the internet at large.

Robin Andersson March 10, 2011 at 12:30 AM

Yup as said above, BFS 29 by WISE. Though only the pink star is seen in visible light if I remember right. The rest is behind gas and dust and (by that) need to be seen in infrared, the nebula contains large amounts of ionized hydrogen.

CE-Camelopardalis in the picture is said to be a Supergiant Star.
This picture was taken somewhere, in 2009… Don’t know exactly.

Robin Andersson March 10, 2011 at 12:33 AM

CE-Camelopardalis is also a variable star, type. Alpha Cygni – though a very low amplitude

joed293 March 10, 2011 at 4:23 AM

BFS 29, captured by WISE

Rick7425 March 17, 2011 at 1:22 PM

CE-Camelopardalis and BFS 29 by NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE).

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