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Universe Today Guide to the Messier Objects

Article Updated: 24 Dec , 2015

by



Well, Tammy’s done it again. Remember the Universe Today Guide to the Constellations? Well now Tammy has completed another monster volume. The Universe Today Guide to the Messier Objects. This is a guide to all 110 Messier Objects, from M1 (the Crab Nebula) to M110 (a satellite galaxy to Andromeda), and everything in between.

In addition to descriptions of the individual Messier Objects, there’s also a nice introduction to the Messier Objects, a guide to doing a Messier marathon, and suggestions for stretching your Messier marathon out to a week.

If you’ve got any questions, comments or feedback, please let us know. I’m sure there are going to be some bugs in there.

Thanks. And thanks again to the wonderful Tammy Plotner for grinding through this monster project.

M1M2M3M4M5M6M7M8M9M10M11M12M13M14M15M16M17M18M19M20M21M22M23M24M25M26M27M28M29M30M31M32M33M34M35M36M37M38M39M40M41M42M43M44M45M46M47M48M49M50M51M52M53M54M55M56M57M58M59M60M61M62M63M64M65M66M67M68M69M70M71M72M73M74M75M76M77M78M79M80M81M82M83M84M85M86M87M88M89M90M91M92M93M94M95M96M97M98M99M100M101M102M103M104M105M106M107M108M109M110

P.S. If you want to use any part of this information for any reason whatsoever, you’ve got my permission. Be my guest. Print them off for your astronomy club, turn it into a PDF and give it away from your site. Republish the guides on your own site. Whatever you like. All I ask is that you link back to Universe Today and the specific page, so people can find out where it came from.

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Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
jamieball
Member
January 21, 2010 10:12 AM

This is awesome, except the first one I clicked on (M50) doesn’t appear to work razz

RapidEye
Member
January 21, 2010 11:15 AM

Looks and works great!!!
One quick suggestion: on each page, put a link to the previous and next M object so you can browse them in order without have to go back and forth to the overview page.
Thanks for such a great resource!!!

Navneeth
Member
Navneeth
January 21, 2010 12:14 PM

Congratulations on the completion, Tammy! I have just one suggestion: a downloadable PDF document. smile

Navneeth
Member
Navneeth
January 21, 2010 12:15 PM

Congratulations on the completion, Tammy! I have just one suggestion/request: a downloadable PDF document. smile

Jon Hanford
Member
Jon Hanford
January 21, 2010 1:35 PM

Wow, Tammy, you’ve really outdone yourself. Fantastic. The few I peeked at were great. Can’t wait to read the full catalog. Congrats!

The Meal
Member
The Meal
January 21, 2010 5:00 PM

Tammy is a modern day Robert Burnham!

Brian Sheen
Member
January 22, 2010 1:51 AM

Another super Tammy magnum opus!

She correctly asks for a acknowledgement when it is copied into other formats.

However the email does not give that information which should read “filed under astronomy 21st Jan 2010”

No doubt I will be using it on a regular basis

WoHu
Member
WoHu
January 22, 2010 3:25 AM

Excellent work, thanks a lot!

There’s one small typo in M13’s description:
“Hanging out in space at a distance of 25,100 light years, this 24 billion year old beauty is one of the most impressive globular clusters for the northern hemisphere.”

I guess 24 billion years would make it a wee bit older than the universe.

nikpawar
Member
nikpawar
January 22, 2010 3:52 AM

Awesome compilation Tammy!
The few I checked out worked brilliantly.

As mentioned above, the downloadable pdf option would be very convenient as well as links to previous and next M objects on individual pages.

Thanks for your efforts smile

HelloBozos
Member
January 22, 2010 6:11 AM

Great list…I just started my own Messier list too. It’s 1/2 way complete..Thanks for this guide Tammy, Way to Go!!!!

Tammy Plotner
Member
January 22, 2010 8:12 AM
gosh… i thank you all for such wonderful comments! i’ve corrected m13 and the “missing messier 50” is now in place. if everyone is interested, i will be very happy to turn this into a pdf document and inverting the star charts so they can be easily read in the field. i will also do a page with a listing of what messiers can be seen during what season, too. when it’s finished, i’ll give it to fraser so it can be downloaded and used freely. once done, i can convert it into a black and white book format (not as exciting as color, but far less expensive to produce) and offer it up for purchase with any… Read more »
Dark Gnat
Member
Dark Gnat
January 22, 2010 10:35 AM

Great work!! Very informative, and well desined.

Have you guys ever considered a UT wiki?

The Eclectic Exterminator of Stupid Electricians
Member
The Eclectic Exterminator of Stupid Electricians
January 22, 2010 3:19 PM
Just read the descriptions of the four Messier planetary nebula; M27, M57. M76 and M97, and am frankly quite disappointed. Sorry It read like a whole mishmash of unrelated ideas on the general nature of these kinds of objects For instance you flippantly say regarding M76; “So it’s bi-polar – just another crazy planetary nebula. But could it be blowing bubbles?” Eh? Bipolar planetary nebula (BPNe) are created by the outflow of material which has torn through the “poles” of the nebula shell (or bubble) It is believed that the bubble-like shells are not exactly the same thickness, and the UV energies emitted from the central star first break through at the poles creating the observed fluted structures.… Read more »
HelloBozos
Member
January 22, 2010 5:50 PM

Hon. Salacious B. Crumb as missed the most important word in this artical,Its even in the heading…

….Guide….

It didn’t say Bible…8^)

The Eclectic Exterminator of Stupid Electricians
Member
The Eclectic Exterminator of Stupid Electricians
January 22, 2010 5:57 PM

@HelloBozos
I think you actually meant “MISguide”, don’t you think?

Tammy Plotner
Member
January 22, 2010 6:16 PM

Hon. Salacious B. Crumb? i think you are the most jealous and malicious person i know. quite frankly, if you can do it better yourself?

do it.

William928
Member
William928
January 22, 2010 6:56 PM

Tammy,

Don’t give old Crumb another thought. I haven’t had the opportunity to look at detail into what you’ve created here, but I’m sure it’s great. I always enjoy your articles on UT. Keep up the good work, and don’t let people like Crumb bother or discourage you. He obviously doesn’t have the talent and/or patience to present anything like this, so it’s easier for him to make unwarranted attacks on those that do. Keep looking up!

Bill

RascWeb42
Member
January 22, 2010 8:49 PM

Hi Tammy
Great job on the Messier objects!
I’m willing to help with converting this to another format if you need some assistance – I’ve already converted all your Messier pages to a “first draft” of a 27MB Word doc and a 26MB PDF file, correcting a few minor HTML code problems along the way. If you are interested, contact me via e-mail.
Larry McNish, Calgary Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada

The Eclectic Exterminator of Stupid Electricians
Member
The Eclectic Exterminator of Stupid Electricians
January 23, 2010 2:40 AM
Tammy here might like to read regarding the distance and sizes of planetary nebula, which has an open discussion on the problems in a historical perspective. This can be found at the ADS; Bensby, T.; Lundström, I. The Distance Scale of Planetary Nebula, A&A., 374, 599 (2001) The paper gives the various mathematical means of calculating these parameters. Note: On Page 610 gives a list of well known and best data on PNe, D (pc) being the distance and R (pc) mean radius of the PNe. None are above 1.0 pc. (3.2 ly.). The range of sizes clearly show that the sizes stated for M76 are quite unlikely. As to the whole collection of Messier objects written about,… Read more »
The Eclectic Exterminator of Stupid Electricians
Member
The Eclectic Exterminator of Stupid Electricians
January 23, 2010 3:14 AM

Tammy Plotner said;

Hon. Salacious B. Crumb? i think you are the most jealous and malicious person i know. quite frankly, if you can do it better yourself?
do it.

I am being neither jealous or malicious. All I have stated is some of the serious errors regarding planetary nebulae contained in one of four objects Actually, M76 I just have happen to have recently done some work on. (I’ve send you a earlier draft of this document via e-mail.) All I’ve done is as Frasier Cain said in the introduction to this article page

If you’ve got any questions, comments or feedback, please let us know. I’m sure there are going to be some bugs in there.

I’ve done that.

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