Earth From Space: Plankton Bloom

by Nancy Atkinson on September 11, 2009

This Envisat image captures a plankton bloom in the Barents Sea. Credit: ESA

This Envisat image captures a plankton bloom in the Barents Sea. Credit: ESA


What a gorgeous shot of our blue planet! This Envisat satellite image taken on August 19, 2009 captures a plankton bloom larger than the country of Greece stretching across the Barents Sea off the tip of northern Europe. The land visible across the bottom of the image belongs to Norway (left) and Russia’s Murmansk Oblast.

Plankton, the most abundant type of life found in the ocean, are microscopic marine plants that drift on or near the surface of the sea. Microscopic plankton have been called ‘the grass of the sea’ because they are the basic food on which all other marine life depends.

The colorful blossoming bloom in the Barents Sea, a rather deep shelf sea with an average depth around 230 m, is approximately 136,000 sq km. In comparison, Greece has a land area of 131,940 sq km.

For more about this image, see this page from ESA.

About 

Nancy Atkinson is Universe Today's Senior Editor. She also works with Astronomy Cast, and is a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador.

Comments on this entry are closed.

Previous post:

Next post: